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  1. #1
    Really Senior Member Gun Surfer's Avatar
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    Mauser Trigger Help

    Timney Sportsman Trigger Mauser 98 without Safety 2 to 4 lb Blue - MidwayUSA


    I have a Mauser 98k type action. The trigger pull is really long and annoying, also erratic and sometimes lets off immediately when you least expect, adversely affects accuracy.



    So I researched it as best as I could, and purchased a Timney trigger for Mauser 98k from Midway. The original trigger has the spring at the front of the housing that just sits in that little cylindrical "tub". There is no attachment other than the one drift pin into its receiver lug. The new aluminum Timney trigger assembly has an allen set screw in the front instead of a spring. The instructions seem to imply that the set screw is used to attach the Timney there by screwing it into the bottom of the receiver. However, the bottom of the receiver has no holes at all for attaching a trigger, only the lug for the drift pin, thats it. Am I supposed to drill and tap the bottom of the receiver, nobody said anything about that in their descriptions. Thanks for any assistance!

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    Member duckcreekdick's Avatar
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    Gun Surfer:
    The little set screw is used only to butt up against the bottom of the receiver and to keep the trigger secure. Don't overdo the tightening, just enough to keep the trigger housing from wobbling.
    After installing the trigger, you may not be able to engage the safety easily. You will then have to put a longer bevel on the cocking piece with a medium india stone or (carefully) with a dremel tool. Not as hard as it sounds, so good luck.

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    Really Senior Member Gun Surfer's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    So since there is no hole for it, the set screw does not actually screw INTO the receiver (beyond the surface), if thats what you are confirming, great.

    When researching the issue, the descriptions and folks I spoke with only mentioned that you needed to use a file or dremel to do some fitting / inletting in the stock or fitting of other parts to make it fit. So using a file, a stone, or dremel to make things work, including the cocking piece if necessary is no problem, I'm ok at that. (Not equipped to drill and tap a screw into a receiver.) Thanks for your response.

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    Thread Starter

    Problem with the trigger installation

    Got it installed pretty good, but with action in the stock, the bolt is hard to open. Then, with magazine / trigger guard assy and action screws installed, it becomes impossible to open the bolt. (Ironically, with the action screwed to the lower magazine/trigger guard assy, without the stock, the bolt will open.) Is this another cocking piece adjustment? The Timney instructions say to adjust "screw #3" for bolt not opening, but that does no good.

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    Member metzgeri's Avatar
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    Two questions:
    -what rifle is this, you say "...98k type.."?
    -is the rear of the tang below the wood? If you cut the wrong wood out, the action could be sitting below the wood at the rear of the action and then the bolt would function stiff or not at all.

    If a stockless barreled action (with all parts installed, including timney trigger) functions properly, and then when all is installed in the stock, it doesn't, then that points to your inleting job.

    Another possibility is that you have the timney trigger binding in the stock where you cut. Be careful when removing the action with the timney trigger installed. The trigger is rather fragile and prone to breaking when twisted wrong.

    Good luck. I have installed several timney with (knock on wood) no problem. But, you seen to have "lucked into" that one in a hundred problem.

    metzgeri

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    The Dayton trigger is less hassle to install than the Timney. Both require a chunk of wood be removed directly in front of the rear guard screw. With the Dayton its about 3/8" x 3/8" and the mortise for the trigger needs to be opened just a wee bit. The Timney requires the triggerguard be modified as part of the housing hits it. I've got 3 Mausers, 2 Swedes and 1 Persian 98/29 with Dayton triggers. I like 'em.

    Sounds like there wasn't enough wood removed for the new trigger. Something is binding.

    Dutch

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    Really Senior Member Gun Surfer's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    Metzgeri Said: "-what rifle is this, you say "...98k type.."?
    -is the rear of the tang below the wood? If you cut the wrong wood out, the action could be sitting below the wood at the rear of the action and then the bolt would function stiff or not at all.

    If a stockless barreled action (with all parts installed, including timney trigger) functions properly, and then when all is installed in the stock, it doesn't, then that points to your inleting job. "

    Reply: It is a 98k, with correct Timney model 102. I am inclined to agree with your logic about the inletting, but dont know how else I could have done the inletting. The rear tang at the action is flush with the stock like before the inletting. The bolt in no way touches the wood. There is still a good seat for the rear action over the rear stock at the rear action screw. I did not change that surface. I HAD to cut back the stock in front of the rear action screw in order to allow the rear of the Timney housing fit into the stock there.

    Below is a photo of the inlet job, did I do it wrong? You can see where I cut the stock in front of the rear action screw hole, but there is plenty of seat for the action left there I would think. Below the rear action screw hole is the trigger slot I had to open enough to let the Timney trigger housing poke through. The Timney housing does not touch the trigger guard when guard is installed.

    http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t...StockInlet.jpg

    Below is what it looks like with the action installed in the stock:

    http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t...s/000_0086.jpg
    Last edited by Gun Surfer; 04-06-2010 at 08:55 PM.

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    Member metzgeri's Avatar
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    It's hard to judge if the inletting is enough, by photo. The best I can do is show you one of mine. It's a spare stock for a Swedishicon mauser I fitted with a timney. It goes to my m/41b and while the one stage is a little hard getting used to if all you shoot is mil. two stage, it is a good trigger.

    I have to agree with Dutch that the Dayton-Traister trigger is a fine one too. I have one for a 98 model and it does require less inletting. I haven't installed it on anything yet, though.

    It looks like your rear tang sits fine, though. That is not the problem.

    metzgeri

    (ps to Dutch...here I go with those darn dark photos again!!!! )




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    Thread Starter

    Inletting

    metzgeri, this is very helpful. Your inletting is very similar to mine. I cannot see where I have done anything wrong. You have a little more opening at the trigger slot than I do, but mine fits fine there with no binding. As I said, the trigger guard does not touch either the Timney trigger or its aluminum housing. Hiowever, I could relieve more wood there to make the trigger opening slot more square and a little larger.

    You seem to have a little bit more inletting rearward, cutting more wood closer to the rear action screw. Maybe on my stock there is not quite enough wood removed from the rear of the stock in front of the rear action screw. So maybe with stock installed, it pushes on the rear of the Timney trigger housing slightly, causing just enough binding to push it up a little, catching the bottom of the cocking piece on the sear when trying to open bolt. Does this rationale make any sense?

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    Yup, that's the first area I'd look at. Put some black shoe polish (or the like) on the rear edge of your trigger and carefully install it in the stock. See if it touches and blackens any of the wood.

    I also know that if I adjust the set screws on the trigger incorrectly, it will lock up the bolt. But I didn't figure this was your problem because of what you said before. If inletting doesn't do the trick, then it has to be the adjustment screws.

    metzgeri

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