+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Remington .25-10

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Senior Member MeatMarket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Last On
    06-25-2013 @ 04:01 PM
    Location
    Beach Island, SC
    Posts
    131
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    10:42 AM

    Question Remington .25-10

    My granddad acquired an old Remington Model 4 .25-10 rolling block rifle. I know it's not a milsurp but didn't figure it would hurt to ask. Does anyone know of any reproduction ammunition is available for this anywhere? I believe the ammo was discontinued back in the 40's. I can't find any vintage ammunition for it and I don't know if anyone makes any special order reproduction or anything.


  2. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Location
    Milsurps.Com
    Posts
    All Threads
    Expert gunsmithing, marksmanship training and equipment for Police, Military and Security personnel as well as for competition marksmen and hunters. William J. Ricca Surplus Sales - Dealer in U.S. parts and accessories Brian Dick ... BDL Ltd. - Specializing in British and Commonwealth weapons Chuck in Denver ... Buy-Sell-Trade .. Guns, Cars Motorcycles Service Publications - Collectors books that earn their place in your library! Your source for the finest in High Power Competition Gear. Banner AD Space Available - Click HERE to Inquire Here at T-bones Shipwrighting we specialise in vintage service rifle: re-barrelling, bedding, repairs, modifications and accurizing. We also provide importation services for firearms, parts and weapons, for both private or commercial businesses.
     

  3. #2
    Contributing Member
    vintage hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Last On
    Today @ 09:26 AM
    Location
    olar s.c.
    Posts
    1,040
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    10:42 AM
    Never even heard of that chambering before. Rimfire or centerfire? Theres a gun show in Columbia this coming weekend and sometimes theres a fellow by the name of William Widner (IIRC) who specializes in obsolete ammo. The only other sources that come to mind is Buffalo Arms or Old Western Scrounger. Good luck. -VH

  4. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  5. #3
    Really Senior Member Johnny Peppers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 09:16 AM
    Posts
    1,756
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    09:42 AM
    I believe the .25-10 was the Stevens .25 rimfire round.

  6. Thank You to Johnny Peppers For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    10-22-2014 @ 05:36 PM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3,637
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    04:42 PM

    Many things are posssible, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Peppers View Post
    I believe the .25-10 was the Stevens .25 rimfire round.

    Not quite. It was apparently developed by Remington as an "improved" Stevens. The dimensions appear to be slightly different. See "The American Cartridge" P.66

    As a rimfire cartridge, it is extremely difficult to make a substitute - fireforming something else is not going to work. But from the dimensions, if I had to do it - and I'm not volunteering! - I would start off with something on the lines of a Winchester Magnum Rimfire, inserted in a brass sleeve to fit the 25-10 chamber. If you are lucky with the geometry, then the striker on the 25-10 will strike and ignite the WMR in the sleeve. If not, then some further work is required on the striker. But probably it will work with a little fettling, and the WMR bullet will scoot down the barrel. Accuracy will be awful.

    Next problem: the bullet is to small for the bore. And if it is jacketed, it is far too hard to give any worthwhile obturation to fit the bore. Massive gas blow-by. So you need lead bullets with a hardness of something like 15+ BH and the appropriate diameter. Time for a special mold.... etc etc.

    In the end, the best answer is going to be turned sleeves fitted with 6mm "Flobert" caps at one end and your home-cast bullets at the other, loaded with black powder. The recess for the caps can then be milled excentrically if the striker cannot otherwise reach the primer and you do not want to alter the striker. Of course, that means that the cartridges can only be inserted with a specific orientation...

    Lads, this is not B-S I'm spouting here. I've done it for a revolver that fires 44 Henry rimfire. Of course, if I had found a S&W Russianicon that fired a c.f. cartridge for 200 euros I would have bought that instead and saved myself the bother, but I had to use what I found. Which was r.f.

    In short, you need to be a dedicated and experienced reloader with a well-equipped workshop and/or a very deep pocket.

    Possible? Yes?
    Worth the bother? Only you can answer that.
    For me, the answer would be "Only if it is a very special type that I wish to use in competitions for historic firearms".

    If it is not regarded as a rare type to be preserved in the original chambering, then I would simply take a look at the option of rechambering to 25-20. An RB is easy to strip down so that a gunsmith can insert a chambering reamer. The chamber is much more accessible than on a bolt-action rifle, and it should not be necessary to separate the barrel from the action body.


    Patrick
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 01-09-2012 at 05:04 PM.

  8. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Patrick Chadwick For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Really Senior Member Johnny Peppers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 09:16 AM
    Posts
    1,756
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    09:42 AM
    It's the .25 Stevens "Long" round, as there was a "Short" version developed later with about half the powder capacity. The Short version used approximately 5 grains of black powder, and the Long version used approximately 10 grains of black powder.

    Or then again, maybe Remington has no idea what they made.

    Model 4 Centerfire Rolling Block Rifle

  10. The Following 3 Members Say Thank You to Johnny Peppers For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Really Senior Member jamie5070's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    10-22-2014 @ 10:52 PM
    Location
    tucson, arizona
    Posts
    315
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    09:42 AM
    You might consider converting it to centerfire and reloading your own. If you live in the states, you might contact the folks at BuffaloArms. Their online catalog shows several different .25 caliber shells that may work for you.
    john

  12. #7
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    10-22-2014 @ 05:36 PM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3,637
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    04:42 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Peppers View Post
    Or then again, maybe Remington has no idea what they made. Model 4 Centerfire Rolling Block Rifle

    A good question, since they have decribed it as "Centerfire" and append a list of rimfire cartridges

    Nevertheless, surely the simple answer would be ream the chamber out to 25-20 and convert the block to centerfire?


    Patrick

  13. #8
    Advisory Panel

    jmoore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 02:44 AM
    Location
    US of A
    Posts
    6,643
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    10:42 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Chadwick View Post
    Nevertheless, surely the simple answer would be ream the chamber out to 25-20 and convert the block to centerfire?

    Feeling right frisky are we?

    But it might work. Even in that tiny action.

  14. #9
    Senior Member MeatMarket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Last On
    06-25-2013 @ 04:01 PM
    Location
    Beach Island, SC
    Posts
    131
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    10:42 AM
    Thread Starter
    I appreciate all the responses, but there will be no reaming, conversions, or alterations of any kind on this piece. We like to keep our vintage weapons 100% original as it is. But if .25-10 is interchangeable with 25 Steven, someone hammer the gavel on the verdict with that. I don't want to try it if it's not meant to be. Thanks for the supply sources too, I'll check to see if they can get their hands on some for me or not.

  15. #10
    Senior Member MeatMarket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Last On
    06-25-2013 @ 04:01 PM
    Location
    Beach Island, SC
    Posts
    131
    Local Date
    10-24-2014
    Local Time
    10:42 AM
    Thread Starter
    I contacted Buffalo Arms asking about the .25-10 ammo and they didn't know what I was talking about but suggested this: Buffalo Arms - Product Detail - 25 Remington Ammunition 117 Grain JSP Box of 20 - $32.00
    Is this right or is it something else?

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Remington m17
    By Fozzybear in forum M1917 and Pattern 1913/1914 Rifles
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 01-13-2012, 11:00 AM
  2. Remington O3-A3
    By coneten in forum M1903/1903A3/A4 Springfield Rifle
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-10-2010, 09:55 AM
  3. CMP Remington 40x
    By Greg V in forum .22 Smallbore
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-22-2010, 12:14 AM
  4. The Remington Society of America (Remington 03, 03A3, 03-A4 Serial Numbers)
    By Badger in forum M1903/1903A3/A4 Springfield Rifle
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-28-2010, 06:44 PM
  5. remington A3
    By popup in forum M1903/1903A3/A4 Springfield Rifle
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 05-13-2009, 10:22 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts