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Thread: DWM M98 dated 1917

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  1. #1
    Member jisii's Avatar
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    DWM M98 dated 1917

    I recently attended an estate auction and bought a 1917 dated Mauser with the DWM logo on the receiver ring and marked "GEWicon 98" on left side of receiver. This rifle has been sporterized by Bubba with the stock cut down, barrel shortened to approximately 24", reblued (somewhat worn) and aftermarket sights (ramp front, lyman 57 rear) installed. The hang tag at the auction said 7mm Mauser but, when I got it home, it turned out to be an 8x57. The bore looks good and I have shot it with some milsurp ammo and it is surprisingly accurate. However, as a minimum, the horribly butchered stock really needs to be replaced, wherein lies the problem: I CANT GET THE DANG FRONT GUARD SCREW TO COME OUT! I have even tried an impact tool with no effect. This is the second Mauser I have run into this problem with, the first being a 1918 vintage Mauser Oberndorf GEW 98.

    Any suggestions on getting that guard screw to come out???? I don't care whether the stock is damaged in the process as it will be replaced anyway.



    Thanks in advance for any help offered.

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    Really Senior Member Calif-Steve's Avatar
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    Most likey rusted in place. Do you know what an "Easy-Out" is? Good luck.

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    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
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    You might not be worried about the stock, but you will not like the price of a correct replacement screw.

    But first things first - has the screw got a locking screw that engages in a segment cut out of the main screw? If so remove this first.
    Assuming that is not the case, since you did not mention it, proceed as follows and NEVER use brute force.

    1) Fix the rifle firmly, but well padded, in a vice and upside down. It is vital that it cannot slip during the next operation.

    2) Now spray on the best penetrating oil you can find and just take a walk or make a cup of coffee, whatever, just give the oil some time to penetrate!

    3) Take some time to select a screwdriver BIT (not a normal screwdriver), the kind that fits in a hex socket. The blade must fit the screw slot well, as otherwise you are going to FUBAR the screw in the next operation.
    (Note for beginners who may not be familiar with Britishicon engineering terminology - FUBAR = ... up beyond all recognition. You can work out the ... for yourself)

    4) Mount the screwdriver bit in a device that will function as a tommy bar (odd word, do US citizens say GI bar?) I use a two-handled tap wrench that can grasp the screwdriver bit. It is important that it is a two-handled tool, as you are going to apply a force that would be quite simply dangerous with one hand.

    5) Now you know why the rifle had to be clamped. You place the screwdriver blade in the slot of the tigger guard screw and, holding the wrench/tommy bar carefully and horizontally turn the bit to TIGHTEN the screw. Yes, you read that correctly. TIGHTEN. It probably won't seem to move even a micron. Now turn to loosen the screw. Maybe still no movement. Don't worry. drop a bit of penetrating oil on the scree head. Repeat. This to-and-fro movement will break the rust binding. No need to hurry, the rifles has been waiting for decades, so a few minutes more don't matter.
    ...
    Eventually you will detect a tiny "give" and will be able to work the screw loose.
    ...
    Don't believe me? Seems very complicated just to remove a screw? I agree but I have used this technique to dismantle a rusty Mauser that was going to be scrapped (I needed the parts - and the screws - in refurbishable condition) and to dismantle an M1917 where the screws had been staked. It works. What does (all too often) not work is to go berserk with a screwdriver or a single-handed tool. If you do not clamp the rifle and use a two-handed tool the screwdriver will slip, resulting in a) a FUBARed screw b) gouged woodwork c) damage to yourself.

    I apologize for what seems a long lecture for an apparently simple operation, but I have wrecked enough things myself with the brute-force method to have really learnt that it is vital to be able to apply considerable but controlled force.

    Hope it works for you!

    Patrick

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    Really Senior Member Dave's Avatar
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    The most important thing is driver bit blade that is FLAT side or even a bit hollow ground, so the force is applied to the bottom of the slot and side, not just the upper opening as a typical tapered blade does. And use considerable downward pressure on the tool as you turn.
    dave

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    Senior Member Bill H's Avatar
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    If the above does not work, and since you really do not care if the stock is saved, remove the stock with the screw still in place, ie., cut the stock away. This allows you to get the penetrating oil where it will do the most good.

    I like the screwdrive in the drill press method, since you can apply ample force to keep the blade in the screw slot, and alignment is easily maintained. Don't turn the drill press on, obviously, rotate it manually.

    With the stock off, you can apply some heat to the action where the screw enters, which sometimes gives quick release to the rusted threads.

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    Really Senior Member Calif-Steve's Avatar
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    Do not cut any stock away. Get an Easy Out a Ace Hardware. New screws are cheap, Century had piles of Mauser parts for cheap. Cut down wood does sell. A new screw is $2-3. Cut down wood is $20.00. Make sure the tiny locking screw is removed, got it?

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    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
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    You lucky people who can get Mauser trigger guard screws for $2-3. Here in Mauserland they cost a mutiple of that. Could someone please explain what an Easy-out is?

    Patrick

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    Member jisii's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks all for the input. Peter, I will try your method, it sounds reasonable.

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    Member Bert's Avatar
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    An Easy-Out is much like a tap to cut internal threads except that the threads are reversed. If a bolt or screw cannot be salvaged a hole appropriate to the size of the boilt/screw is drilled in the center and an equally appropriate size Easy-Out is inserted in the hole. It is turned counter clockwise which drives the Easy-Out into the bolt/screw. The Easy-Out has a square shank and a wrench can be used to turn it and the bolt/screw will be removed. I'll wager you have the same tool in your locale but known by a different name. Possibly a Tommy-Out??

  12. Thank You to Bert For This Useful Post:


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    Really Senior Member Jim K's Avatar
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    Patrick Chadwick gives some good advice, but I would like to take it a step further.

    First, note that failure to get a slot screw to move is almost always due to the fact that the screwdriver rides up and out of the slot when you try to turn it.

    If you have access to a drill press, clamp the rifle in the (padded) drill press vise. Then use a stub screwdriver bit as Patrick suggests, but clamp it into the drill press chuck. DO NOT TURN ON THE POWER.

    Bring the blade down and line it up by moving the press bed and vise as necessary, turning the chuck by hand to line up the blade with the slot.

    Then, use the drill press handle to hold the blade tightly down into the screw slot and turn the chuck by hand, snapping it back and forth. This technique will remove all but the most stubborn screws.

    If a drill press is not available, a vise can be used, but will require two people. Using a T handle as Patrick suggests, and padding one vise jaw, insert the rifle in the vise sideways. Hold the T handle driver with the screwdriver blade in the screw slot, while tightening the vise so the opposite jaw bears on the top of the T handle. Then turn the handle using a wrench or a longer handle. The idea is the same, to keep the driver blade pressed tightly into the slot.

    Note that an easy out is normally used when a screw head is broken off and the rest of the screw is broken off in the hole. And it does not always work, either. If the screw is really rusted tight, the head may need to be drilled off, then a drill of minor thread diameter used to cut away the screw. The screw threads can then be picked out using a dental pick or a small screwdriver.

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim K; 06-29-2009 at 11:35 AM.

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