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  1. #11
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by villiers View Post
    ????????? Since when?

    Don't worry Patrick, it happens to all of us. You know you've been here too long when you go back to the country of your birth and upbringing, and those who never left say "You do speak English well, where did you learn it?", thinking they are being nice to a foreigner.

    In other words - one's gone a wee bit native. An Italianicon once described me as "Germanizzato". Since we were discussing political economics, I chose to take that as a compliment.
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 08-25-2013 at 08:58 AM.

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  3. #12
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by villiers View Post
    Since when?
    Pardon me, I was going by your profile...
    Regards, Jim

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    Really Senior Member villiers's Avatar
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    Nae bother ... ... as yours are the next two rounds.

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    Really Senior Member gunner's Avatar
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    I dont like glossy finishes. They weren´t in use with army rifles.....only glossy looking rifle i can remember is a shellack finished Mosin-Nagant M1891.
    Regards Ulrich

    Nothing is impossible until you've tried it !

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    Member gemihur's Avatar
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    Military wood finishes

    I know I'm digging up bones but woodworking and refinishing doesn't go out of style and always needs to be addressed again eventually.
    I've recently got into stock creations and have had to learn much about wood finishes and the results of many different chemistry's on different species of woods.
    This thread gas been quite enlightening to me, Thank you.
    Here's an example of one of my projects.

    ... and attached.

    comments welcomed
    Thank you,
    Jimmy

  8. #16
    Member RogueAussie's Avatar
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    So for someone that's about to oil up a dry stock, whats the difference between using BLOicon, RLO or a BLOicon/Turps mix?

  9. #17
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
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    Real turpentine is a must

    Mixing natural turpentine - not any turps substitute/paint thinner/refinery leftovers - with the BLOicon helps it to penetrate the wood. Simply sloshing on linseed oilicon can result in a sealing layer of what is effectively linoleum on the surface and very little deep penetration of the wood.

    And when treating a very dry stock, the internal surfaces (barrel channel and receiver cut-out) must be liberally oiled, as these areas have usually been ignored for the last century or so. Yet they are the areas that are heated up and dried out most by shooting. Don't be mean - use a narrow (1/4") paintbrush and make sure that you get the oil (made thinner with a little turpentine) into all the nooks and crannies, including the system bolt holes - and the stockbolt hole (if the rifle has an Enfield-style stockbolt)..

    Make sure that the oil has really penetrated and dried before repeating any treatment. No tackiness! This means being patient and waiting a couple of WEEKS after the first soaking of the internal surfaces. Subsequent treatment can use less turpentine, but the very first must penetrate well, as later applications seal the wood more and more.

    Remember, the primary object is to keep the wood healthy, not to make it look pretty. Prettiness is a by-product of decades of care and drop-by-drop polishing!
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 02-26-2020 at 05:02 AM.

  10. Thank You to Patrick Chadwick For This Useful Post:


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    Member RogueAussie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Chadwick View Post
    Mixing natural turpentine - not any turps substitute/paint thinner/refinery leftovers - with the BLOicon helps it to penetrate the wood. Simply sloshing on linseed oilicon can result in a sealing layer of what is effectively linoleum on the surface and very little deep penetration of the wood.

    And when treating a very dry stock, the internal surfaces (barrel channel and receiver cut-out) must be liberally oiled, as these areas have usually been ignored for the last century or so. Yet they are the areas that are heated up and dried out most by shooting. Don't be mean - use a narrow (1/4") paintbrush and make sure that you get the oil (made thinner with a little turpentine) into all the nooks and crannies, including the system bolt holes - and the stockbolt hole (if the rifle has an Enfield-style stockbolt)..



    Make sure that the oil has really penetrated and dried before repeating any treatment. No tackiness! This means being patient and waiting a couple of WEEKS after the first soaking of the internal surfaces. Subsequent treatment can use less turpentine, but the very first must penetrate well, as later applications seal the wood more and more.

    Remember, the primary object is to keep the wood healthy, not to make it look pretty. Prettiness is a by-product of decades of care and drop-by-drop polishing!
    Thanks Patrick, very informative. I'll definately be going witht he 50/50 mix to treat the timber!

  12. #19
    Advisory Panel Brian Dick's Avatar
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    My method is straight raw linseed oil. Boiled linseed oil has chemical driers added and will probably need the turps because it doesn't penetrate as well and dries much quicker. I stopped using it when i learned what the original finish was 20+ years ago. The original finish was raw linseed oil warmed in a tank with the wood submerged for variable times depending on condition and dryness. I modify this a bit by sitting the wood out in the sun and warming it up, then applying the RLO with a sponge brush, let soak for a half hour turning as necessary for full on sunlight, gently rub out by hand using 0000 steel wool and wipe off the access with a blue paper towel. Make sure you take a toothbrush and clean out the bearings while wet so there's no build up because it can change the bedding if you don't. Keep adding coats until you like the finish or the wood stops absorbing it. I usually do about 4-6 coats. I've never mixed RLO with turps and the finishes I get are identical to original. Unlike BLOicon, RLO will remain a little tacky when you're done but that's the way it should be and it will go away with handling and use pretty quick. It also naturally oxidizes over time giving a nice reddish tint. Many use stain to try and duplicate this with BLOicon and other finishes.

  13. #20
    Advisory Panel Brian Dick's Avatar
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    I forgot to add that the Britishicon also used to add a mystery powder to their warmed tanks of RLO as a built in stain. After quite a bit of research some friends and I think that it was ground alkinet root but no one seems to really know for sure.

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