+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: I knew that, here are some pictures of the Whitneyville rifle I asked about.

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Member retired05's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    02-25-2015 @ 09:57 PM
    Posts
    6
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    12:59 PM

    I knew that, here are some pictures of the Whitneyville rifle I asked about.

    I hope these pictures help.
    Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0010.jpg‎
Views:	101
Size:	189.4 KB
ID:	60467   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0009.jpg‎
Views:	88
Size:	161.5 KB
ID:	60466   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0008.jpg‎
Views:	78
Size:	172.4 KB
ID:	60468   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0006.jpg‎
Views:	89
Size:	184.1 KB
ID:	60469   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0003.jpg‎
Views:	81
Size:	194.8 KB
ID:	60470  

  2. Thank You to retired05 For This Useful Post:


  3. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Posts
    All Threads
    Banner AD Space Available - Click HERE to Inquire We specialise in military utensils and artefacts such as helmets, daggers, medals and badges, etc.  The on-line store is intended for personal browsing and searching of collecting objects. All items are provided historical value only and can be used for home collection or other purposes except of fascism, Nazism or other extremism manifestation or its propaganda. LIMITED TIME OFFER FROM THE AMERICAN GUNSMITHING INSTITUTE: Get Immediate Online Access To AGI's NEW Armorer's Course for Glock Pistols, Covering Every Generation of Glocks, Including the Latest Model 42/43 and Double Stack Pistols for ONLY $7.00! Brian Dick ... BDL Ltd. - Specializing in British and Commonwealth weapons Chuck in Denver ... Buy-Sell-Trade .. Guns, Cars Motorcycles We pride ourselves on being the new lowest price listing service, and the simplest to use. If you need to buy or sell collectible firearms or any firearm in your legal possession, then this is the place for you. If you’re a big collector clearing house, or other seller that could benefit from a Premium seller account, then we can also support you here at Gunonline.com. Your source for the finest in High Power Competition Gear. Here at T-bones Shipwrighting we specialise in vintage service rifle: re-barrelling, bedding, repairs, modifications and accurizing. We also provide importation services for firearms, parts and weapons, for both private or commercial businesses.
     

  4. #2
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    Today @ 09:31 AM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,669
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    08:59 PM
    Thanks for the photos. They certainly do help. Now we can all see that it is not a cartridge rifle, but a percussion carbine. But not a military rifle. Possibly a cut-down of a full-length rifle. Which raises the question: why should it be marked 45-60? Could you please post a photo of the 45-60 marking?

    The backsight is unusual. It looks like the kind of backsight usually found on lever-action rifles and carbines.
    The ramrod fitted in a thimble attached to the barrel is a feature usually associated with percussion shotguns.
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 02-25-2015 at 12:35 PM.

  5. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  6. #3
    Contributing Member WarPig1976's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Last On
    Today @ 02:47 PM
    Location
    Delaware county, PA just outside Philadelphia.
    Posts
    2,590
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    02:59 PM
    Real Name
    Jeff
    Could the hammer be modern? I asked because it looks very similar to the hammer on a pistol I built from a kit years ago.

  7. #4
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    Today @ 09:31 AM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,669
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    08:59 PM
    retired06, your latest photo clearly shows 45-60 - a cartridge designation - on a percussion rifle.

    Unless someone comes up with another explanation, I must conclude that the barrel and backsight were taken from a "donor" BPCR and fitted to an old percussion remnant. I use the word remnant, because the percussion portion itself appears to be a cut-down from a long rifle.

    In other words, it does not appear to be an original of any type, rather an opportunistic mixture.

    For your sake, I would prefer to be wrong, as this opinion must be disappointing to you. But it does underline that a) photos are of prime importance in any kind of evaluation, and b) seller's verbal claims and explanations are all too often not worth the paper they aren't written on. If you bought it for a price based on the premise that you were getting an original Whitney gun, then I consider that you have grounds for returning it to the seller or requesting a price reduction.
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 02-25-2015 at 04:28 PM.

  8. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Patrick Chadwick For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    Today @ 09:31 AM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,669
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    08:59 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by WarPig1976 View Post
    Could the hammer be modern? I asked because it looks very similar to the hammer on a pistol I built from a kit years ago.
    I was wondering a bit myself. The style is not reliable as a proof, as good replicas are based on real originals. But for the one item on a percussion rifle that is usually the most battered, it does seem a trifle fresh. It would be necessary to remove the hammer and look on the back surface. If it is forged, with traces of filing marks, then it is more likely to be original than if it is cast. However, the real killer feature is 45-60 stamped on the barrel of a percussion rifle.

    ---------- Post added at 10:35 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:25 PM ----------

    ...Notice the two gouges at the bottom of the lockplate?
    ...Notice how they do not carry over into the wood.
    ...Notice how the gap between lockplate and wood has been filled.

    I doubt that this lock is original to the stock.
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 02-25-2015 at 04:38 PM.

  10. #6
    Contributing Member gsimmons's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Last On
    Today @ 02:56 PM
    Location
    Western North Carolina
    Posts
    1,353
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    02:59 PM
    The prportions

    ---------- Post added at 04:42 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:42 PM ----------

    The proportions look all off to me as well.

  11. Thank You to gsimmons For This Useful Post:


  12. #7
    Member retired05's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    02-25-2015 @ 09:57 PM
    Posts
    6
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    12:59 PM
    Thread Starter

    I am not disappointed in the opinions expsessed on the Whitney mutt.

    I thought all along that this rifle was a mutt. I thought I was bidding on a Remington Rolling Block at an auction but I was wrong. Should have paid more attention to what was going on. Still, as soon as I can get some bullets, I will try it out. Thank you everyone for your comments.

  13. #8
    Really Senior Member gew8805's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last On
    07-07-2019 @ 04:30 PM
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    576
    Local Date
    07-21-2019
    Local Time
    02:59 PM
    Let us know how it does.



    The gun is relatively new, my guess as to age is about 30 or 40 years old. The only part with any age to it is the barrel which is from the third quarter of the 19th Century and as suggested above it appears to have been made from a breech loading arm. The barrel band may also date back that far. The lock and it's side plate date from the 1970s as does the trigger guard. The butt plate was made at the time the gun was built and is well done but not historically correct in it's construction, butt plates are usually cast. The stock is a little course but shows good effort by an inexperienced builder.

    All the above being said, it may turn out to shoot pretty well after you have found the proper patch and ball combination as well as the best powder charge. Remember to start low and work your way up slowly and carefully; unless the breech plug is pulled to check the threads, you have no way of knowing if it is properly done, it may be best to have a black powder experienced gunsmith pull it to check it first.

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. Whitneyville Armory ???
    By retired05 in forum Black Powder
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-25-2015, 01:38 AM
  2. The .30 Carbine rifle that you probably never knew existed!
    By imarangemaster in forum M1/M2 Carbine
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-12-2013, 07:07 AM
  3. A GlobCo 303 smle target rifle, who knew
    By RJW NZ in forum The Lee Enfield Knowledge Library Collectors Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-08-2012, 08:00 AM
  4. Pictures of 1903 Mk I Ross Rifle
    By boltaction in forum The Ross Rifle Knowledge Library Collectors Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-21-2012, 12:11 PM
  5. Pictures - 1950s USMC Rifle issue and rifle cleaning
    By Joe W in forum M1 Garand/M14/M1A Rifles
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-06-2009, 10:40 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts