+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Netflix

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 03:02 AM
    Location
    Southern Corner Western Australia
    Posts
    5,404
    Local Date
    11-16-2018
    Local Time
    11:52 PM
    Real Name
    CINDERS

    Netflix

    Was watching the series on WWII when they broached the subject of "Shell Shock" "Battle Fatigue" that the soldiers suffered.
    In it they stated the combat expectancy for a front line soldier was 284 days in the line which had me thinking about a soldier in the 1st WW.
    From memory I think it was from the book A Larrikin on the Western Front about an Ausie diggers experience, anyway the story follows this chap whom I think landed at Gallipoli then to the Western Front to carry on the business there.

    He was granted 1 weeks leave in London after 3 years solid fighting yes he went to the rear but often there were fatigue parties or long marches there & back, with Arty killing friends and civies alike along the way.
    But true to the creed of sharing everything they the chaps & mates gave him a big wad of francs so he could really live it up as his mates might be dead when he got back
    And given the truly appalling conditions and hopeless tactics its a wonder he kept the sanity together for that long at all.
    As I was reading the book it just hit home what a sordid and horrid life they endured those chaps, true there were some really funny moments but death was always close.
    And they knew nothing of shell shock and what it did to the nervous system I have watched a few doco's on it from WWI and it is not pretty to watch.

    Just some thoughts on the different eras that were the world wars as we know them.
    Last edited by CINDERS; 04-04-2018 at 05:56 AM.

  2. The Following 3 Members Say Thank You to CINDERS For This Useful Post:


  3. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Location
    Milsurps.Com
    Posts
    All Threads
    No Drill-Tap scope mounts for Mosin Nagant, Mauser K98K, Yugo M48, Swedish M96 and M38, Swiss K31, K11, 1911 and more! Bringing mil-surplus rifles to modern standard without damaging historical values! We specialise in military utensils and artefacts such as helmets, daggers, medals and badges, etc.  The on-line store is intended for personal browsing and searching of collecting objects. All items are provided historical value only and can be used for home collection or other purposes except of fascism, Nazism or other extremism manifestation or its propaganda. LIMITED TIME OFFER FROM THE AMERICAN GUNSMITHING INSTITUTE: Get Immediate Online Access To AGI's NEW Armorer's Course for Glock Pistols, Covering Every Generation of Glocks, Including the Latest Model 42/43 and Double Stack Pistols for ONLY $7.00! Brian Dick ... BDL Ltd. - Specializing in British and Commonwealth weapons Chuck in Denver ... Buy-Sell-Trade .. Guns, Cars Motorcycles We pride ourselves on being the new lowest price listing service, and the simplest to use. If you need to buy or sell collectible firearms or any firearm in your legal possession, then this is the place for you. If you’re a big collector clearing house, or other seller that could benefit from a Premium seller account, then we can also support you here at Armory.Auctions LLC. Your source for the finest in High Power Competition Gear. Here at T-bones Shipwrighting we specialise in vintage service rifle: re-barrelling, bedding, repairs, modifications and accurizing. We also provide importation services for firearms, parts and weapons, for both private or commercial businesses.
     

  4. #2
    Really Senior Member henry r's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Last On
    Today @ 04:38 AM
    Location
    northern tablelands nsw Australia
    Posts
    598
    Local Date
    11-17-2018
    Local Time
    02:52 AM
    Real Name
    henry.
    One of the things that interests me is the way that psychologically messed up soldiers were viewed after the different conflicts.

    I had always thought that shell shock was pushed aside and not talked about like combat fatigue post ww2 etc.

    Then i read a series of novels written in the 1920's. The main character talks about an acquaintance that "is still a bit shell shocked" but he isn't looked down apon for it and is treated accordingly by all. It is just how he is now.
    It surprised me to the point that it has stuck in my mind for 20 years.

  5. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  6. #3
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 04:36 PM
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Posts
    20,656
    Local Date
    11-16-2018
    Local Time
    07:52 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by henry r View Post
    One of the things that interests me is the way that psychologically messed up soldiers were viewed after the different conflicts.
    Or, viewed but ignored. We were ignored until about Yugoicon in '92 and then things started to transform. Sad to see some of the early guys just slip away unnoticed and later guys got the world by comparison. For those thinking this "Greatest generation" didn't suffer anything and were tougher or some such b*llshit, it just ain't so. I listened to my dad yelling for guys that weren't there any more until his death...and he drank himself there. I grew up knowing lots of the guys from WW1 that were just as bad. Then there's the ones after... When you look you see.
    Regards, Jim

  7. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to browningautorifle For This Useful Post:


  8. #4
    Really Senior Member Daan Kemp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Last On
    Today @ 03:37 AM
    Location
    Centurion RSA
    Posts
    232
    Local Date
    11-16-2018
    Local Time
    05:52 PM
    Real Name
    Daan Kemp
    We had in the South African Army an excellent process of 'desensitizing/downloading/reintegrating/etc' soldiers coming out of operations. Took about a week or so, but delivered excellent results for getting back to life. We are talking operational deployment for three to six months without seeing anything except African bush. Wonderful life for a soldier, but it certainly presented unique challenges when you eventually got home.

    Yes we still have challenges from previous operations when this process hadn't been implemented yet, and quite a few really senior guys who still regret they sidestepped/didn't go through the process.

  9. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Daan Kemp For This Useful Post:


  10. #5
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 03:02 AM
    Location
    Southern Corner Western Australia
    Posts
    5,404
    Local Date
    11-16-2018
    Local Time
    11:52 PM
    Real Name
    CINDERS
    Thread Starter
    One other aspect from one of the WWII soldiers who rotated home after 3 years of combat said of the home coming that the thing that affected him the most was the silence and lack of noise.
    I agree with BAR on the matter that hopefully better systems are in place for the returning soldiers as the conflicts we have today remind me of what issues faced the forces in VN as who was Charlie now days its who is the terrorist and whilst they operate out of residential areas sadly civilians are being killed which no allied or NATO soldier would want.

    My Brother in law a returned VN vet counselled for a fair while but the strain on him helping these chaps get over their VN tour/s took a toll on him eventually he had to give it away as it brought to many ghosts out of the closet and memories that he would rather stay buried he did not want to leave his mates but had to for his own sake.


+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. NetFlix
    By CINDERS in forum Book and Video Review Corner
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-21-2017, 06:03 AM
  2. Netflix
    By CINDERS in forum The Watering Hole OT (Off Topic) Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-10-2015, 05:12 PM
  3. Classic old movie on Netflix
    By Bob Womack in forum Vintage Military Vehicles and Aircraft
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-08-2015, 09:02 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts