+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: National Geo "Spitfire"

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 08:16 PM
    Location
    Southern Corner Western Australia
    Posts
    5,489
    Local Date
    12-19-2018
    Local Time
    11:09 AM
    Real Name
    CINDERS

    National Geo "Spitfire"

    Just watched on Bigpond Movies a doco on the Spitfire a fairly recent one there are some superb air to air shots of this magnificent aircraft because thats what it was.
    You may argue with validity about the P-51 which was a junket until it got the Merlin or the P-38 which the british tried without supercharged Allison engines and gave them back.
    A side note is an aeronautical designer went to Germanyicon and was employed by the Luftwaffe returning to Englandicon in 1933 and ended up working for Mitchell.
    Funny thing is the double eliptical wing of the aircraft was not new idea, a German designer came up with it around the time of WWI, they seem to think maybe this designer who came back to Mitchell was a spy from Britain!



    The thing is when Britain stood alone and she truly was in those darkest of days apart from aircrew coming from her dominions the situation was most dire.
    Infact some of the surviving pilots from the battle of britain said if Hitler had crossed the channel England was finished.
    The candor of these veterans and pictures of them in their youth fighting a most terrible war has to be seen some were only 18 years of age hardly lived and are sent out to kill or be killed.

    There is some touching moments etched into their faces you can tell when they recount certain facts but always underplayed their part in the Battle of Britain or Malta.
    A very last touching point is where one of the ATA women signed a Spitfire in 1944 the last one she flew (She flew 400 Spitfires and a total 1000 aircraft during the war)
    Any way the private owner has her spifire that she signed it never went to war so bore her signature to this day, they re-united her with the plane she watched it fly in & land.
    It was a really a moving moment for her and well in general the owner asked her if she would sign the aircraft again which she did she was only a few month shy of a 100 y/o.

    The have a gem of a Spifire in Britain the only surviving one from the Battle of Britain it is so very precious to the flight as it is irreplaceable.
    One of the pilots on the end of the doco said"The generation before us had a war, our generation had a war and the next generations went through war."
    We have to find a solution!

    I have seen allot of docos on the Spitfire as not only a mark of respect to its designer but to those that flew them and worked on them.
    But mainly because my father was a LAC Engine Fitter in the RAAF 1941 to 1945 and worked on them as well, I still have his books from his courses.
    Its worth the watch just for the airshots of that plane in flight.
    Cheers.
    Last edited by CINDERS; 12-06-2018 at 09:16 AM. Reason: Typographical error corrected

  2. The Following 7 Members Say Thank You to CINDERS For This Useful Post:


  3. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Location
    Milsurps.Com
    Posts
    All Threads
    No Drill-Tap scope mounts for Mosin Nagant, Mauser K98K, Yugo M48, Swedish M96 and M38, Swiss K31, K11, 1911 and more! Bringing mil-surplus rifles to modern standard without damaging historical values! We specialise in military utensils and artefacts such as helmets, daggers, medals and badges, etc.  The on-line store is intended for personal browsing and searching of collecting objects. All items are provided historical value only and can be used for home collection or other purposes except of fascism, Nazism or other extremism manifestation or its propaganda. LIMITED TIME OFFER FROM THE AMERICAN GUNSMITHING INSTITUTE: Get Immediate Online Access To AGI's NEW Armorer's Course for Glock Pistols, Covering Every Generation of Glocks, Including the Latest Model 42/43 and Double Stack Pistols for ONLY $7.00! Brian Dick ... BDL Ltd. - Specializing in British and Commonwealth weapons Chuck in Denver ... Buy-Sell-Trade .. Guns, Cars Motorcycles We pride ourselves on being the new lowest price listing service, and the simplest to use. If you need to buy or sell collectible firearms or any firearm in your legal possession, then this is the place for you. If you’re a big collector clearing house, or other seller that could benefit from a Premium seller account, then we can also support you here at Armory.Auctions LLC. Your source for the finest in High Power Competition Gear. Here at T-bones Shipwrighting we specialise in vintage service rifle: re-barrelling, bedding, repairs, modifications and accurizing. We also provide importation services for firearms, parts and weapons, for both private or commercial businesses.
     

  4. #2
    Contributing Member 30Three's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Last On
    12-11-2018 @ 04:20 PM
    Location
    France
    Posts
    371
    Local Date
    12-19-2018
    Local Time
    04:09 AM
    Thanks for the info Cinders. The Spitfire is my personal favourite; closely followed by the Mosquito, Hurricane and Lancaster. The sound of the merlin engine is probably the most fabulous mechanical noise ever!

  5. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  6. #3
    Contributing Member BEAR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    12-16-2018 @ 08:28 PM
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    351
    Local Date
    12-18-2018
    Local Time
    07:09 PM
    I know very few of you will believe this but in 1966 I was attending the American High School in Bushey, London. I had to stay late because my older brother played football and he was my ride home to Harpenden. While I was doing homework in one of the empty classrooms I heard an aircraft approaching. My first thought was "That's a Spitfire!". When I ran outside there in the evening sunshine was this "glorious Spit" flying low and slow over the school. After watching him disappear over the trees I suddenly thought "How do I know what a Spitfire sounds like?" I had never seen one in flight or heard its engine.
    So now I think I am a reincarnated Spit pilot
    By the way some years later I found out that they were filming The Battle of Britainicon during this time.

  7. Thank You to BEAR For This Useful Post:


  8. #4
    Moderator
    (M1 Garand/M14/M1A Rifles)
    Bob Womack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 07:22 PM
    Location
    Somewhere Between Clever and Stupid
    Posts
    2,566
    Local Date
    12-18-2018
    Local Time
    10:09 PM
    My adventurous uncle ran across the border to Canadaicon and joined the RCAF as Englandicon found herself with her back against the wall before the Battle of Britain. He trained to be a pilot, transitioned to fighters, was posted to RAF Hawarden in Wales where he transitioned into the Spitfire. As he finished training he petitioned to be assigned to the Eagle Squadrons that were populated by Americans. He was killed in a training accident on July 1, 1941. I came across the Battle of Britain Mk.I Spitfire mentioned above, K9942, which now resides at RAF Cosford. I found its logbook posted online. It turns out that it was assigned to my uncle's Operational Training Unit and station while he was training. The OTUs were furnished with either "caned out" planes that had been overstressed or damaged planes that had been repaired but weren't considered battle-worthy. We've got uncle Harry's logbook. Spitfire K9942 doesn't appear in it, but it is nice to know that it was there on the flight line and he walked by it, and probably lusted after it like the rest of us.








    Bob
    "It is said, 'Go not to the elves for counsel for they will say both no and yes.' "

    Frodo Baggins to Gildor Inglorion, The Fellowship of the Ring

  9. The Following 6 Members Say Thank You to Bob Womack For This Useful Post:


  10. #5
    Contributing Member 25-5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Last On
    Today @ 08:00 PM
    Location
    1945
    Posts
    209
    Local Date
    12-18-2018
    Local Time
    09:09 PM
    After Cinders post last night I was able to watch the doc on Amazon Prime. I enjoyed every second and will watch it again. Loved the aerials.
    Young heroes died almost in front of their families. Those few months saved the world from Herr Hitler.
    "He which hath no stomach to this fight,/ Let him depart." Henry V

  11. Thank You to 25-5 For This Useful Post:


  12. #6
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 08:16 PM
    Location
    Southern Corner Western Australia
    Posts
    5,489
    Local Date
    12-19-2018
    Local Time
    11:09 AM
    Real Name
    CINDERS
    Thread Starter
    There was another doco on Bomber Command its an old one it goes through the groups training in Canadaicon before going to Englandicon multinational side of things but also interviews at that time crews from the various planes like the Whitley, Wellington, Lancaster and so on and like one pilot said in a fighter you can funk it and no one will know you did but you cannot funk it in a Bomber because of the six other crewmates with you.
    At the OTU's the attrtition rate from my foggy old brain I think was in the region of 46% being killed before they qualified sometimes higher so it was more dangerous to learn their operational trade than doing the actual 30 missions the RAAF had to do for a tour of duty.
    In one scene that is so tragic its a Lancaster in a vertical dive going behind some trees and the ominous black cloud of smoke and flames erupts from behind them people start running I gues out of instinct but must have known all aboard the craft must have died......

  13. #7
    Moderator
    (Parker Hale Forums)
    Gil Boyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last On
    Today @ 04:03 PM
    Location
    Home of The Parachute Regiment & 16 Air Assault Brigade
    Posts
    2,999
    Local Date
    12-19-2018
    Local Time
    03:09 AM
    Bob,
    Looks like he came up through the ranks the hard way like my dad. How did he finish up?
    'Tonight my men and I have been through hell and back again, but the look on your faces when we let you out of the hall - we'd do it all again tomorrow.' Major Chris Keeble's words to Goose Green villagers on 29th May 1982 - 2 PARA

  14. #8
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 08:16 PM
    Location
    Southern Corner Western Australia
    Posts
    5,489
    Local Date
    12-19-2018
    Local Time
    11:09 AM
    Real Name
    CINDERS
    Thread Starter
    From Post #4 Gil "He was killed in a training accident on July 1, 1941"

  15. #9
    Moderator
    (Parker Hale Forums)
    Gil Boyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last On
    Today @ 04:03 PM
    Location
    Home of The Parachute Regiment & 16 Air Assault Brigade
    Posts
    2,999
    Local Date
    12-19-2018
    Local Time
    03:09 AM
    Appreciate that, but no mention of his rank or indication on his service dress, was interested, because the hardest climb to becoming a pilot was through the ranks, the same in WW1 with the RFC, "not what you knew, but who you knew" was very much in the times of the day, it also helped if you had a dog...................so you now know what I meant. My Dads rise was a nightmare.........he was Irish and often punched toffee nosed idiots out of squadrons, he was always joined in the cells he told me with Canadians and Aussie pilots who found the arrogance too much to bear when all they wanted to do was kill Germans!!!!!!!
    'Tonight my men and I have been through hell and back again, but the look on your faces when we let you out of the hall - we'd do it all again tomorrow.' Major Chris Keeble's words to Goose Green villagers on 29th May 1982 - 2 PARA

  16. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Gil Boyd For This Useful Post:


  17. #10
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 08:16 PM
    Location
    Southern Corner Western Australia
    Posts
    5,489
    Local Date
    12-19-2018
    Local Time
    11:09 AM
    Real Name
    CINDERS
    Thread Starter
    The was as much a "Class System" in Englandicon as there was in India though it was thinly vieled as Aristocracy I am not sure who coined the phrase "Glamour Boys" as I am positive 99% of those enlisting to be trained as fighter as pilots were there to fight the Hun as their fore-fathers did and the 1% were there for the ladies and what status a Pilots Wings would give them as L/O's to the girls!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Bought a complete National Match set up "Everything" Rare
    By Rick B in forum M1 Garand/M14/M1A Rifles
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 05-18-2014, 09:05 PM
  2. WWI "human pictures" FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
    By HOOKED ON HISTORY in forum The Watering Hole OT (Off Topic) Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-25-2013, 03:34 PM
  3. National Geographic Special on IMA : "Family Guns"
    By Richardwv in forum Martini Henry Rifles
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-31-2012, 03:23 AM
  4. Garand "National Match" edition
    By blackcat_attilio in forum M1 Garand/M14/M1A Rifles
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-07-2011, 05:32 PM
  5. M1 Carbine - National Postal Meter - Rare "U" code?
    By rokwell in forum M1/M2 Carbine
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 06-24-2010, 11:44 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts