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Thread: Winchester P14 stock restoration

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  1. #1
    Really Senior Member jonh172's Avatar
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    Winchester P14 stock restoration

    I am restoring a Winchester P14 I got as a sporter and was fortunate enough to find a Winchester stock from a forum member. I have also accumulated all the parts needed to return it to original and am being meticulous in finding only W stamped parts. So far, the only non W stamped parts I have left are the cocking piece, rear sight, buttplate and middle band.

    The stock came stripped of any finish aside from the deeply rooted black stains.



    My plan is to rub the stains with lacquer thinner in hopes of at least lightening them.

    Does anyone have a better technique?

    Once satisfied I will give it a light sanding with 220grit (not touching the cartouches) and stain to match the handguards. Finish with BLOicon and reassemble.

    The rear handguard is W stamped and from what I can tell still carrying its original finish. I stained the front handguard to match and can hopefully match the stock.

    More to come as things progress.

    https://www.snapagogo.com/image/cpSKLh
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    https://www.snapagogo.com/image/cpSEH6
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    https://www.snapagogo.com/image/cpSxml
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    Last edited by jonh172; 04-20-2019 at 01:37 AM.

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    Senior Member oldfoneguy's Avatar
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    Your links aren't working. Without seeing what your working on its hard to make a determination. I always try to avoid petrochemicals on wood as they have an extreme drying effect and can cause splintering.
    I use a heat gun directly on the trouble spots. Do not heat it enough to boil the oil still in the wood. The oil will rise and bring the grime with it. I then wipe clean with cotton flannel or something equally as soft then repeat until as much comes off as I can get. As a side benefit the heat helps raise some of the lighter dings in the wood that fill with oil and grime. Avoid getting heat near the cartouches because it has the same effect on them and they will raise and disappear.
    I avoid using sandpaper if at all possible and prefer to work with steel wool. Generally 3/0 and 4/0 and very light pressure. You are much less likely to cause gouging with steel wool than sandpaper and once you gouge you have to sand more to remove it and the viscous circle begins.
    If you don't have a heat gun a hair dryer can be used it just takes a little longer.
    Also if no heat gun or hairdryer is available steam can be used as well but again without overheating and avoiding the cartouches by safe distance.
    I also use steam to raise deeper remaining dents once clean again avoiding any cartouches or markings which there are no shortage of on Britishicon rifles.
    Good luck, fix your links and keep us posted on your progress.
    Last edited by oldfoneguy; 04-20-2019 at 10:31 AM.

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    Contributing Member WarPig1976's Avatar
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    Oxalic acid aka Wood Bleach is your friend.

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    Really Senior Member jonh172's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldfoneguy View Post
    Your links aren't working. Without seeing what your working on its hard to make a determination. I always try to avoid petrochemicals on wood as they have an extreme drying effect and can cause splintering.
    I use a heat gun directly on the trouble spots. Do not heat it enough to boil the oil still in the wood. The oil will rise and bring the grime with it. I then wipe clean with cotton flannel or something equally as soft then repeat until as much comes off as I can get. As a side benefit the heat helps raise some of the lighter dings in the wood that fill with oil and grime. Avoid getting heat near the cartouches because it has the same effect on them and they will raise and disappear.
    I avoid using sandpaper if at all possible and prefer to work with steel wool. Generally 3/0 and 4/0 and very light pressure. You are much less likely to cause gouging with steel wool than sandpaper and once you gouge you have to sand more to remove it and the viscous circle begins.
    If you don't have a heat gun a hair dryer can be used it just takes a little longer.
    Also if no heat gun or hairdryer is available steam can be used as well but again without overheating and avoiding the cartouches by safe distance.
    I also use steam to raise deeper remaining dents once clean again avoiding any cartouches or markings which there are no shortage of on Britishicon rifles.
    Good luck, fix your links and keep us posted on your progress.
    Thanks for the tips!
    I just finished 3 runs of Circa 1850 stripper followed by boiling water from a kettle then washed with warm water and dawn. I used scotch brite pads and steel wool to apply and wash.
    The stains have lightened but show no signs of disappearing.
    The hot water didnt seem to help so maybe its not oil I'm dealing with?

    My links dont work if copied and pasted?

    ---------- Post added at 12:06 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:05 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by WarPig1976 View Post
    Oxalic acid aka Wood Bleach is your friend.
    Never heard of oxalic acid so did some research... Sounds to good to be true!
    I will be picking some up tomorrow!
    Thank you Warpig!

  8. #5
    Contributing Member WarPig1976's Avatar
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    Oh it's true. If it doesn't remove stains completely they'll at least be lightened significantly. If the first application doesn't get it do another, three at most because then you're just wasting time. let each application dry over night to let the acid do it's work. Once the stock is oiled they can be very hard to detect.
    No need to get all suited up it's a very mild acid. It won't eat your skin or clothes or anything crazy like that, just gloves if wish but eye protection is always a must while using tools and chemicals.

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    Really Senior Member jonh172's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarPig1976 View Post
    Oh it's true. If it doesn't remove stains completely they'll at least be lightened significantly. If the first application doesn't get it do another, three at most because then you're just wasting time. let each application dry over night to let the acid do it's work. Once the stock is oiled they can be very hard to detect.
    No need to get all suited up it's a very mild acid. It won't eat your skin or clothes or anything crazy like that, just gloves if wish but eye protection is always a must while using tools and chemicals.
    I saw some videos of guys dunking their hands in it to show how mild it is!
    Being derived from rhubard I hope it leaves a fresh out of the oven scent!

    Again I very much appreciate the tip!!
    Results to follow.

  10. #7
    Really Senior Member jonh172's Avatar
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    Double post

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    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Here are the OPs original pics for posterity and the guys that look here on phones and notebooks...
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    Regards, Jim

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  13. #9
    Really Senior Member jonh172's Avatar
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    After applying circa furniture stripper, then wiped with acetone, then boiling water poured on it and then washed with warm water and dawn repeated 3 times, the stains are stubbornly hanging in there.

    Progress Progress - Album on Imgur

    (Trying Imgur, hopefully this works)

  14. #10
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarPig1976 View Post
    Oxalic acid aka Wood Bleach
    Did you try this though...?
    Regards, Jim

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