• Lee Enfield Story (Wallaceburg Museum)

    Wallaceburg Museum Video (Republished here with the kind permission of Alan Mann)

    Chatham-Kent: Lee-Enfield Rifle Web Page

    In 1878 James Paris Lee invented a rifle box magazine with the capability of firing a deadly 30 rounds per minute. Ten thousand of the rifles were sold to the U.S Navy, and it became standard issue in the British Army for the next sixty years.

    Lee had worked in Wallaceburg with his father as a watchmaker and perfected the rifle with the help of his brothers. They fired shots across the Sydenham river into an Oak tree over 100 yards away.

    To view any video simply click on the film strip PLAY button. Click on video while playing to PAUSE and use other buttons at the bottom of the video window to adjust your personal viewing preferences, such as viewing in FULL SCREEN mode. Make sure you turn on your speakers and set the the volume appropriately.

    This article was originally published in forum thread: Lee Enfield Story (Wallaceburg Museum) started by Badger View original post
    Comments 10 Comments
    1. Brian Dick's Avatar
      I was born in Chatham, just south of Wallaceburg and good friend loaned some of the rifles in the display. I'll have to tell him to log on and see the video. Thanks!
    1. the old gringo's Avatar
      do i have this correct the US Navy adopted the 6mm version of this rifle and because of barrel wear or damage from ammo it was scrapped ? what years was this in? thanks for info
    1. Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
      Quote Originally Posted by the old gringo View Post
      do i have this correct the US Navy adopted the 6mm version of this rifle and because of barrel wear or damage from ammo it was scrapped ?

      The 6mm Navy Lee was not the same as the British Lee Enfield. Both rifles had an action designed by Lee, but otherwise there is no connection. The actions were also different, the 6mm Navy Lee using a straight-pull action. Google it, and search these forums!

      And then you will realise that this text, compressing 30 years of John Paris Lee's creative life into one sentence is grossly misleading:

      "In 1878 James Paris Lee invented a rifle box magazine with the capability of firing a deadly 30 rounds per minute. Ten thousand of the rifles were sold to the U.S Navy, and it became standard issue in the British Army for the next sixty years."

      I think the technical term is "hogwash". 1878 was blackpowder time. No single barrel action of that era could fire 30 rounds a minute. And a magazine can't fire anything at all! There were several patents for box magazines from 1875 to 1893. The very first Navy contract was for a rifle in 45-70, which was eventually manufactured by Remington. The 6mm Navy Lee was made on the basis of patents ca. 1893. etc etc etc...

      If that is supposed to be a museum imparting technical knowledge, one can only despair.
    1. Surpmil's Avatar
      That looks interesting, but so far no joy:

      Attachment 43600

      It would be interesting to know more about Mr. Lee. Did he leave any diary or autobiography commenting on the design process?
    1. Badger's Avatar
      Quote Originally Posted by Surpmil View Post
      That looks interesting, but so far no joy:
      I assume you're saying you can't play the video? If so, I'm not sure why as I just re-tested it and it's playing fine on both Apple Mac's and Windows based PC's under every browser we had access to, including IE9, IE9, IE10, Safari, Chrome and FireFox.

      It's most like a lack of some add-on element being installed on your browser.

      If you send us a tech support request from the contact menu with information about your system config and browser type and configuration, we'd be happy to try and help you out.

      Regards,
      Doug
    1. butlersrangers's Avatar
      I recently ran across some pictures of Lee rifles being carried in Military parades in Michigan. On Decoration Day 1895, members of the Detroit Naval Reserves were photographed going into formation at Campus Martius, where they 'presented arms' to ranks of Civil War Veterans. The Sailors were bearing Model 1885 Navy Lees in .45-70. I also am posting a picture of Spanish American War Veterans or Michigan National Guardsmen, circa 1900, during a Winter parade in Ypsilanti. The men are bearing Model 1899 Lees in .30-40, along with Lee-Mills belts and bayonets.
    1. gsimmons's Avatar
      Do you know what street the Ypsi picture was taken? It looks familiar. Nice piccies, thanks for sharing. I have a watch presented to a Chief Master at Arms who was in the Mi. Naval Brogade.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2

      ---------- Post added at 07:40 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:39 AM ----------

      Edit; Brigade


    1. butlersrangers's Avatar
      gsimmons: The picture of Michigan National Guard/Spanish American War Veterans (in 1900 they would almost be synonymous) belongs to the Ypsilanti Historical Society (photo archives - viewable online). Their description: Spanish American War Veterans on Congress Street at the bridge. Parading west on Congress. Nicholas & Panek Upholstery Store. 1900 Winter - snow on ground. (I do not know Ypsilanti, well. I can see Tracks on street, so I suspect Rail Road or Inter-urban. I imagine Parade is at Thanksgiving or New Year's. It is obviously very cold with gloves and strange Rifle Carry. The men are leaning into wind or walking up slope).

      ---------- Post added at 10:43 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:38 AM ----------

      I would wager the display at Wallaceburg is a lot more enjoyable than the very inaccurate video. James Paris Lee deserves better!
    1. OldmanTD's Avatar
      That is an excellent video , since I'm not far from Wallaceburg I will take a drive to see the museum
    1. browningautorifle's Avatar
      I was raised near Leamington/Wheatley area, just south of Chatham. That was close to Wallaceburg...just south a bit. Didn't know that museum existed.
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