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    Contributing Member RRPG's Avatar
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    50,000+ WW2 cartridge cases in one pit!

    Hi All



    I think the title says enough......

    50,000+ WW2 Cartridge Cases Stephen Taylor, WW2 Relic Hunter


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    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    The 9mm cases fired by Sten are apparent, deep crater of firing pin strike...
    Regards, Jim

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    Contributing Member mrclark303's Avatar
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    Quite the haul!

    I would personally be seperating out those rare WW1 .303 chargers.

    ---------- Post added at 08:30 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:22 AM ----------

    It's amazing the amount of gear that used to get dumped, right up until the end of the 1980's.

    My local RAF base ( Kemble) was sold off by the MOD in the 1990's, the clean up required was by all accounts quite the very expensiveheadache!

    Back in the day, no one was concerned by dumping gallons of hydraulic fluid etc onto the base dump along with all manner of time expired aircraft parts.

    I remember 1970's era red arrow Gnat canopies being pulled out of the tip when I worked at the base, during the first stage of the clean up....

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    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrclark303 View Post
    I would personally be seperating out those rare WW1 .303 chargers.
    I could see that but I doubt they'll be useable after 70 plus in the ground...refurb and display only...
    Regards, Jim

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    Really Senior Member Sunray's Avatar
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    Burying ammo was an easy and free way of disposing of unwanted ammo. There were stories about Viet Nam era U.S. National Guard units running a range exercise where very few troopies showed up. Ammo ordered for 100 guys, 20 show up, big hole got dug, balance of the ammo put in, Senior NCO off loads his coffee into said hole, thus making it a latrine, hole filled in.
    "...those rare WW1 .303 chargers..." Same as the W.W. II chargers.
    Spelling and Grammar count!

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    In the 80's a group of these aircraft digger types unearthed an old RAF WW2 fighter at a village called Wootton near here. There were boxes and boxes of ammo, all or most still looked sort of OK. The RAF came to take it all away (good bloke, RAF bomb jockey called Trevor Alford who I knew well....). He gave me a long length of belt. 4 ball, one tracer, one AP and 1 incendary. I fired some off at Moody Down range but while it all(?) went bang, it was pretty poor. The trace wouldn't light but the incendary certainly fizzed when it hit a falling plate

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    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Laidlericon View Post
    while it all(?) went bang,
    Hangfires? Click/bang?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunray View Post
    those rare WW1 .303 chargers..." Same as the W.W. II chargers.
    Wrong again, the early chargers had an elongated hole in them compared to the later ones with just round holes. That's the difference between early and WW2.
    Regards, Jim

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