+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Vans instant gun blue?

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Senior Member nhetzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    05-20-2014 @ 06:46 PM
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    169
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    10:43 PM
    Real Name
    Nick Hetzer

    Vans instant gun blue?

    Hey all, I usually hang out in other areas on here but I had a question about Vans instant gun blue. First I will tell you what I do know about it. My buddy picked some up at a gun show recently. I usually don't buy into "miracle products" that folks are peddling at shows because sometimes they are equivalent to snake oil salesmen. We busted this stuff out and I used it on an old commercial Model 11. Astonished doesn't even put it into perspective. The product is clear. I put it on a bare metal "zero finish left" magazine tube and after a little patience the bluing came out of the metal. My question for those of you who are experienced with this is this: does the finish have any kind of durability or is it basically just aesthetics? This seems like an ethical way to breathe life into some old guns without hurting the value since it is only pulling the guns own bluing out of the metal and not applying a new coat. Thoughts?


  2. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Location
    Milsurps.Com
    Posts
    All Threads
    Expert gunsmithing, marksmanship training and equipment for Police, Military and Security personnel as well as for competition marksmen and hunters. William J. Ricca Surplus Sales - Dealer in U.S. parts and accessories Brian Dick ... BDL Ltd. - Specializing in British and Commonwealth weapons Chuck in Denver ... Buy-Sell-Trade .. Guns, Cars Motorcycles Service Publications - Collectors books that earn their place in your library! Your source for the finest in High Power Competition Gear. Banner AD Space Available - Click HERE to Inquire Here at T-bones Shipwrighting we specialise in vintage service rifle: re-barrelling, bedding, repairs, modifications and accurizing. We also provide importation services for firearms, parts and weapons, for both private or commercial businesses.
     

  3. #2
    Really Senior Member Johnny Peppers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 08:54 PM
    Posts
    1,756
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    10:43 PM
    A worn collectible gun is still worth more than one touched up with cold blue. Cold blue is really the kiss of death on highly collectible guns that are seldom found in nice condition.

  4. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  5. #3
    Senior Member barbarossa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last On
    11-29-2013 @ 10:37 PM
    Location
    Two Blocks From Galveston Bay in Texas
    Posts
    141
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    11:43 PM
    I have used Van's Gun Blue for years and consider it a pretty good product. It seems to work best on low carbon steel and a good bead blast will certainly enhance the final result and durability. Several years ago, I refinished an Enfield revolver that someone had written their social security number on the barrel flat with an electropencil. Thus far, the revolver has been carried in a belt holster on three backpacking trips and is only now losing some finish on the tip of the barrel and the front of the cylinder. I also refinished a put together M/1911A1 for a friend and the final result was not only very handsome but also bore a strong resemblance to a military style refinish. So. long and short of it all, it does a pretty good job of refinishing an old gun not worth the expense of a hot blue or parkerizing job performed by a competent gunsmith.

  6. #4
    Really Senior Member gew8805's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 04:43 PM
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    467
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    11:43 PM
    Does it actually say "pulling the guns own bluing out of the metal"? That is pretty much impossible since the original bluing was a surface treatment and once gone is gone for good, whether rust blue (the longest lasting) or chemical bluing done in tanks. Cold blues are, as Johnny Peppers said, "the kiss of death" for collectible guns, they are not bringing anything out of the metal, just applying a not so long lasting temporary finish finish in place of an original finish that is gone for ever.

    Use cold blues for touch up on small spots where the original finish has been scrapped off, other than that it will simply down grade the condition calling into question the gun's originality in the same manner that a stock refinish does. Sorry, those are the facts.

  7. Thank You to gew8805 For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Senior Member nhetzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    05-20-2014 @ 06:46 PM
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    169
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    10:43 PM
    Real Name
    Nick Hetzer
    Thread Starter
    I did some more reading and experimenting with this stuff. No, it doesn't say that it pulls the blueing out of the metal, that is just how it was described to me. How it works is still a bit of a mystery to me. I wouldn't go as far as to call this stuff "cold blue" either though as it is not like any cold blue I've seen. It is a clear chemical with absolutely no pigmentation to it. I don't use it on my military firearms but I have used it on several old commercial guns. I will say that thus far it is everything it says it is. I like it because it doesn't make an old gun look brand new and glossy. It simply fills in the places where the blue is worn and strangely enough, if the the finnish is dull and faded, that's what you get. It always matches up perfectly with whatever is on the gun. My opinion in the end is that if you have something that needs touched up, or you want to help preserve grandpa's old Remington Model 10 without losing the aged look of the gun, then this stuff is a winner. You will have to wrestle with your own conscience as far as choosing to use it on a military or otherwise collectable gun though.

  9. #6
    Really Senior Member Johnny Peppers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 08:54 PM
    Posts
    1,756
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    10:43 PM
    The color of the cold blue solution has nothing to do with the color it turns the firearm. The cold blue process is basically an oxidation of the surface, turning it a somewhat blue color.

    Really no conscience wrestling on a collectible firearm. The only thing that keeps cold blue from being at the top of the list of collectible no-no's is chrome plating, but if you like it go for it.

  10. #7
    Senior Member barbarossa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last On
    11-29-2013 @ 10:37 PM
    Location
    Two Blocks From Galveston Bay in Texas
    Posts
    141
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    11:43 PM
    Nhetzer, I agree with your remarks entirely. Van's Instant Gun Blue is good stuff for the casual shooter/shadetree gunsmith needing to touch up an old firearm not worth the price of a gunsmith quality hot blue job, competent or otherwise. Why is it a major sin among the shooting fraternity to touch up an old Marlin Model 60 not worth the expense of a trip to the local gunsmith? I'll never understand it, especially when we are talking about dirt common guns that'll never have one lick of collector value now or in the future. Judging by remarks, it would seem that touch up bluing on an old gun is tantamount to calling the virtue of a fellow's mama into question. It's one of those subjects you can always count on to raise the ire and righteous indignation of some portion of the shooting fraternity. As is noted, it is a crime against humanity to use the stuff on a highly collectible gun in decent condition, but ya know, in the long run, it's all in the eye of the beholder. Some people out there will completely reblue a worn, mismatched but otherwise collectible Luger in a heartbeat. To that guy, it is not a collectible grade gun but merely a 'shooter grade gun'. Guess it all depends on what is the definition of the word 'collectible'-- a very nebulous term, subjective at best, wherever it is tossed about. No matter what you hanker to collect in the way of firearms, there will always be 'bottom feeder' quality examples of any give firearm which someone will feel inclined to wanna clean up for personal use. I'm not entirely certain anything is ever lost to posterity by such an action, except the money the owner has just thrown down a rathole and will never recover should he ever sell the gun in future. Whether you approve of his action or not, the firearm in question is still that individual's property and no one else's. You can encourage an individual not to reblue that old mismatched Luger, but in the scheme of things it's their property that they paid for and therefore have the right to do with as they will. You may not like a guy who junks up his yard by filling it with old truck tires but zoning laws aside, it is his business what he does with his possessions whether you are in complete accord with his actions or not.

    Would I do my damnedest to dissuade a fellow from rebluing a collectible gun best just left alone in its present condition? Yep, I would and have done so numerous times in the past. Would I try to stop a shooter from cleaning up a rust pitted mismatched gun totally devoid of finish and worth only the sum of its parts to be sold on eBay? Nope, probably wouldn't.
    Last edited by barbarossa; 03-23-2011 at 12:48 AM.

  11. #8
    Really Senior Member Johnny Peppers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last On
    Today @ 08:54 PM
    Posts
    1,756
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    10:43 PM
    Highly collectible doesn't include the Marlin Model 60, and the Model 60 is the ideal rifle to practice using cold blue on. And, I could care less what someone does with their own property, but I also don't want anyone to be misled into thinking touching up that old Cavalry model SAA with cold blue is just the thing to do just because someone else is enamoured with it's magical properties of drawing the original blue back out.

  12. #9
    Senior Member barbarossa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Last On
    11-29-2013 @ 10:37 PM
    Location
    Two Blocks From Galveston Bay in Texas
    Posts
    141
    Local Date
    10-22-2014
    Local Time
    11:43 PM
    Well said and sage advice, Johnny Peppers!

    Cheers

    Barbarossa

  13. #10
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    Today @ 05:36 PM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3,637
    Local Date
    10-23-2014
    Local Time
    05:43 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by nhetzer View Post
    This seems like an ethical way to breathe life into some old guns without hurting the value since it is only pulling the guns own bluing out of the metal and not applying a new coat.
    This is a complete mix of concepts that need to be taken separately. It is easiest from back to front. Here goes:

    "not applying a new coat". Already noted, not true. Cold bluing does alter a very thin surface layer.

    "only pulling the guns own bluing out of the metal". Already noted, a nonsense phrase worthy of a snake-oil salesman.

    "without hurting the value". Already noted, it certainly does hurt the value of collectable items. It is falsification.

    "way to breathe life into some old guns". I strongly disagree. A "live" gun is one that can and does shoot. Whether or not and how well does not depend on the surface finish.

    "ethical". Ethics hardly come into it, except for interactions with other people and their values. It is, for instance, definitely unethical is to falsify any artefact with the intent of gaining an advantage over others. Which is what tends to happen when the "improved" items are sold on.

    Just my 2 cents/pence/groats (take your pick) worth.

  14. Thank You to Patrick Chadwick For This Useful Post:


+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Irwin Pedersen Instant Classic
    By AZCarbineFan in forum M1/M2 Carbine
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-04-2010, 11:27 PM
  2. Blue parts on an 03-A3
    By jarrodeu in forum M1903/1903A3/A4 Springfield Rifle
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-22-2010, 10:03 AM
  3. Does Bubba Blue?
    By Echo Bravo in forum Gunsmithing for Old Milsurps
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-26-2009, 12:29 AM
  4. Blue Because Of My Blue
    By STYER in forum M1917 and Pattern 1913/1914 Rifles
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-23-2009, 08:02 PM
  5. re blue
    By XLR8 in forum Gunsmithing for Old Milsurps
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-07-2007, 08:09 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts