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  1. #1
    Really Senior Member m4a3sherman's Avatar
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    Brno 98/22

    Hello all

    So, I have a Brno Model 98/22 on the way; should be here Tuesday or Wednesday at the latest (I'll post pictures then). I would like to know a little bit about these rifles. I have read the brief paragraph about them in Ball's book but I was wondering if there was more. For example, is there a way to tell to whom it was sold? I understand a large number of countries purchased them from Czechoslovakiaicon in the 20s and 30s when the Czechs re-equipped their home army with Vz23s and later VZ24s.

    Also, any fun facts I should know about them in general? How about production; were they all produced between 1922 and 1923 or were some built later on contract from other countries? How commonly are they encountered? I have seen relatively few on Gunbroker lately and not many elsewhere. Additionally, which bayonet is correct for it? One assumes the long "export" style bayonet would be correct but assuming is well... assuming.



    Thanks for all your help guys!

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    Really Senior Member Calif-Steve's Avatar
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    The very early run of 98/22's were actually Germanicon Gew98's parts from WWI. Some will have German rear sights and German triggerguards. You will find a small number of German stocks mixed in the pile if you ever examine 10-20 rifles. I have a 98/22 that is marked VZ-24 in my collection. Not common.

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  5. #3
    Really Senior Member m4a3sherman's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    hmmm, Well I know mine doesn't have lange vizir sights.... but perhaps other parts will be Germanicon upon closer inspection next week.

  6. #4
    Really Senior Member Calif-Steve's Avatar
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    Try this:
    Now I will try to clear up a little controversy on these 98-22 rifles. Some people think these early 98-22 rifles were not used by the Czech. military but the proof is on page 58, middle illustration, in Ball's book as anybody can see, the "E23" Czech. army acceptance mark. I am going to call Ball's book reference (B) and, as we know, Ball's book is mixed up in some places but also is a good reference overall. In (B), page 242, second picture on left, is the receiver ring marking and the correct western numbered rear sight slide is on page 243 of (B), left middle picture. The Turks re-worked, swapped many parts on their many types of Mausers as I have had the early 98-22 with the Turkish Arabic numbers on the rear sight slide and vice versa. In short, the Turks did not change from the Arabic to the western alphabet (numbers) until 1928, long after these "E23" (1923) made rifles.

    Now marking (TWO). The receiver ring is marked in three lines: 1: CS. Zavody na 2: Vyrobu Zbrani 3: Brno. Translation: 1: "C" Czech, "S" Slovakia, "Zavody" factory, "na" for 2: Manufacture (of) Arms 3: Brno. (Czechoslovakian factory for manufacture of arms Brno) (Nothing on left rail.) This mark can be seen in (H) on page 13, illustration #4. This marking was used on VZ-23, 98-22, and early VZ-24 rifles. (B), page 59, middle illus., shows "E23" Czech. army mark on their 98-22 rifles. (Navy arms imported these rifles also.)

    Now marking (THREE). The receiver ring is marked in three lines: 1. Ceskoslovenska, 2. Zbrovka,. 3. Brno. Translation 1. Czechoslovakian, 2. Arms factory, 3. Brno. (Czechoslovakian Arms Factory Brno) (B), page 13, illus. # 5. Usually "VZ.24" is on the left rail. (H), illus. 7, page 7. These marking are found on Czech. army (military.) rifles (VZ-24's) and export rifles like the Brazilicon VZ-24 on pages 30-31 in (B). It was also used on later 98-22 rifles, exported (made) for Turkey, as new rifles with no "E23" on the left side of the receiver ring. (Reference (B), page 242, bottom picture.) Turkish Arabic numbers are on the rear sight slide. (Navy arms imported these rifles from Turkey also.) As I said, the sight slides could be swapped by the Turks. (Nothing on the side rail as no 98-22's are marked 98-22.)

    Now marking (FOUR). On the left receiver rail in two lines 1. Ceskoslovenska Zbrojovka, A.S., Brno, 2. VZ.24. Translation: 1. Czechoslovakian Arms Factory "A.S." LTD (inc.) Brno, 2. type (model)-1924 (Czechoslovakian Arms Factory Inc. Brno, Model 1924. (H), page 13, illus. #3. These are the most common marked Czech. Mauser's. Usually a crest like the Czech. lion crest on Czech military issue rifles ((H), illus. #6, page 13) or the crest of the country purchasing the rifles are on the receiver ring. Some rifles of this fourth type marked rifles only have a date on the receiver ring top, like 1937 China, Japanicon and 1938-1939-1940 Rumania. However on my Guatemalan rifle, the VZ-24 is not on the side rail. ((B), page 137, left middle picture.

    The (FIFTH) marking now. In two lines on the side rail 1. Fabrica Checoslovaca De Armas, 2. S.A. Brno. Translation 1. Factory Czechoslovakia of Arms, 2. "S.A." LTD (Inc.) Brno. (Factory Czechoslovakia of Arms, Inc., Brno) ((H), page 13, illus. #9) As you can see, this marking (address and co. name) is in Spanish as on my Colombian VZ.24 and other South American Mausers. ((B), page 54, picture left top. (The Colombian crest is on the receiver ring, (B), page 54, right top. illus.)

    Coming up the (SIXTH) marking. In two lines on the left rail 1. Cs. Zbrojovka AKC. SPOL.V Brne 2: VZ.33. Translation 1. Czech. "S." Slovakia, arms factory, "AKC. SPOL." LTD (Inc.) "V" at "Brne" Brno, 2: VZ.33 type (model) 1933. (Czechoslovakian Arms Factory, Inc., at Brno Model 1933). ((H), page 13, illus. #10) This is not an army (military) rifle but is a police (financial guards) arm. It. has the Czech. lion on the receiver. ring. I guess you noticed Brno was spelled differently in this marking (Brne.) I will quote from Joe Steen's letter to me to explain it. "The form "Brne " is hard to explain because it's a grammatical variation that occurs when Brno is used in certain situations. V Brne means at Brno and it's because of the preposition V meaning that the spelling of the word changes." I noticed "AKC. SPOL." is the "A." "S." in the other markings, spelled out longer. Two other Czech. made Mauser's I know of have this marking. In the August 1995 "Karabiner Collector's Network" was an article by Robert Jensen that had a Steyr (BNZ) rework of a standard lion crest, large ring, VZ.24 that had this 6th marking with, of course, VZ.24 below the marking, instead of VZ.33. This is the only one like this I have ever seen. The second rifle is my model 1932 Peruvian (Brno) Brne Mauser. The rifle has the same address with modelo 1932 (model 1932), not VZ.33, on the left rail below the address. It has the Peruvian crest on the receiver ring. ((H), page 40, illus. #3, Peru) (This short rifle has a small ring action, like the VZ.33.) The gun can be seen in: "Guns of the World" by Hans Tanner (out of print) on pages 235, top picture, page 272 picture #21, and page 274, picture #9; also in (O), page 179, top picture.

    Now the (SEVENTH) type of marking. In one line on the rail Zbrojovka Brno, A.S. VZ.24. (Arms Factory Brno Inc. Model 1924). This is mark #4 without the word Ceskoslovenska. ((H), page 13, illus. #13) It was used after the Nazi's took over Czechoslovakia as they did not like the word Czechoslovakia. It was used on rifles made for the Nazi's and on export rifles sold to their ally Rumania.

    Now to the (EIGHTH) marking. In one line on the side rail Ceskoslovenska Zbrojovka A.S. Brno. (Czechoslovakian Arms Factory, Inc., Brno) This is marking #4 without the "VZ.24" because the rifles were not VZ.24's. ((O), page 128, bottom picture) Most had the large stamped one piece trigger guard floorplate and some did not. This was used on 98K Germanicon re- worked rifles after WWII. Some had the German model-code and date on the receiver ring and some are blank. I heard that the Bolivian series, B-50, is marked the same way. This is the story of the eighth main Czech. Mauser rifle markings.

    Now I will describe some other Czech. Mauser rifle markings. The 98-29 long rifle, the 1930 carbine and the VZ.24 made for Iran (Persia) are marked on the left rail in "Farsi" (modified Arabic). ((H), page 30, Iran, illus. #3 and #5) Translation: gun factory of Brno and year of manufacture. The plant at Brno made for the Germans during WWII the G.33/40. Translation "G" Gewehr (rifle), "33" based on VZ.33, "40" adopted in 1940. This mountain carbine (a modified VZ.33) was made from 1940 to 1942, with code 945 in 1940 and 1941 and code dot in 1941 and 1942. After this they made the regular 98K under code dot in 1943, 1944, and 1945. They also made in 1945 98Ks with code SWP. The other Brno plant, in Bystrica, made in WWII for the Germans the G.24(t). Translation "G" Gewehr (rifle), "24" based on the VZ.24, (t) for Czechoslovakia which starts with a "T" in German. The rifle is a cross between a VZ.24 and a 98K, as it has features of both rifles. The rifles were made in 1941 and 1942 with code dou. The regular 98K was made with code dou in 1942, 1943, 1944 and 1945. The last Brno code marked rifles are 98K rifles made at Brno for East Germany. They are marked with the code tgf (1950) on top of the receiver ring.

  7. #5
    Really Senior Member m4a3sherman's Avatar
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    Wow... I need you to be my lawyer... But this does bring up a good point; I've recently been drawn to the Czechicon rifles because there is a great diversity in them. Right now, without necessarily focusing on them, I've got three already- 1937 Chinese contract, this 98/22, and a Brazilianicon guerilla model. That's another good question; according to Ball, the Brazillian contract was only 15,000 rifles; granted they are mostly found pretty rough, but why are they so cheap?
    In the world of enfields, rifles that number under 100,000 sometimes command a premium so why not here? I suppose the same goes for these 98/22s. There doesn't appear to be very many left yet I paid under $200 for mine and she's not bad looking.

    Hmmmm
    Thanks for the superb information- I'll be printing that out for my records I think!

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    Really Senior Member Calif-Steve's Avatar
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    Germanicon Mausers have a huge following. The Czechicon Mausers do not have a following to speak of. The very early G98/22's are actually German Gew98's. But not marked so. Collecting the Czech Mausers is a good and easy way to amass a nice collection without breaking the bank.

  9. #7
    Really Senior Member m4a3sherman's Avatar
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    Hmmm the mosin nagants if the Mauser world as it were... Well I would definitely like to grab more Czechicon rifles as things go on- they will definitely be worth a little something after a while- a short while at that, I feel.
    I have to say, I'm very pleased about this purchase and can't wait to see her in person and post pictures.... Now we simply play the waiting game...
    Ah yes- while we are semi on the subject; my 1937 dated vz24 is not it the correct prefix, L, I think it is, for the Chinese contract? According to Ball they are all part of the same lot and mine, last I looked, was not... Any thoughts?

  10. #8
    Senior Member Jim's Avatar
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    Excellent post Steve, Thanks for that detailed info! It's just going to take another day when I'm more alert to sift it all.
    In the meantime, I have one of those 98/22 that doesn't quite fit the mold for the Turk "contract" rifles. It has the different markings arrangements. I'll just drop some pics-


  11. #9
    Really Senior Member m4a3sherman's Avatar
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    AH HA! Mine came in yesterday (I've not had time to take photos but they are coming!) and it is in the same configuration Jim. The only difference I see, is that I have Czechicon proofs on the left side of the receiver, which, if I am interpreting everything correctly, means it was in Czech service and then Turk, so not a "contract." But it too has the Farsi rear sight. Additionally, while all numbers but the bolt match, I suspect many parts of Gew98 origin. Pics to come shortly.

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    Really Senior Member m4a3sherman's Avatar
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    OK, so I've finally braved the heat and instructed Sht_le to photograph my rifle in a nice sunlit garden and here are the pictures. The bayonet is my token VZ bayonet and before I get too many people telling me, I know the handguard screw is missing; it was at home from the night before but rest assured it is back in its place!













    It's a Turk!

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