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    Member 676161's Avatar
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    Question Ross bolt put together correctly?

    Hi Folks,



    Greetings from PA in the USAicon where I now live. I got my first military long arm when I was about 12. I traded a (toy) cap gun and $1 (the dollar was worth something then) for a "last ditch" Japanese 7.7mm Arisakaicon. In the 50 years hence, my collection has gotten a bit out of hand, as I now have some 50+ rifles dating from the Spanish American war to the fall of the Sovieticon Union.

    I am also an occasional shooter and having read so much about the accuracy of the Canadianicon Ross, I'd like to shoot the one I have. It's a Mark II with US flaming bomb acceptance stamps on the bayonet and stock. I'm apprehencive about the possibility of a miss assembled bolt. Anyone know of a way to look @ the bolt and know it's been put together correctly? I've never had it apart. I suppose I could simply shoot it from the hip to make sure, but I'd prefer something less risky.

    Thanks in advance
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    There's an outstanding article by "PerversPépère ", on Ross M-10 Rifle Bolt Disassembly (click here) and the dangers of doing it incorrectly. It may be found under the Technical Articles for Milsurp Collectors and Re-loaders (click here) forum of the Milsurp Knowledge Librariesicon. .........

    Also, in the Canada - Milsurp Knowledge Library (click here), there's a really nice example of a 1916 M10 Mk. III Ross Rifle (Marked to 16th Battalion CEF and also stamped "CRB").... click here

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    A Mk. II rifle bolt cannot be misassembled the way a Mk. III bolt can be.
    For your own piece of mind, just watch the bolthead as you close it. You will see it kick over to lock.

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    Member Rossguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiriaq View Post
    A Mk. II rifle bolt cannot be misassembled the way a Mk. III bolt can be.
    For your own piece of mind, just watch the bolthead as you close it. You will see it kick over to lock.
    Quote Originally Posted by 676161 View Post
    Hi Folks,

    Greetings from PA in the USAicon where I now live. I got my first military long arm when I was about 12. I traded a (toy) cap gun and $1 (the dollar was worth something then) for a "last ditch" Japanese 7.7mm Arisakaicon. In the 50 years hence, my collection has gotten a bit out of hand, as I now have some 50+ rifles dating from the Spanish American war to the fall of the Sovieticon Union.

    I am also an occasional shooter and having read so much about the accuracy of the Canadianicon Ross, I'd like to shoot the one I have. It's a Mark II with US flaming bomb acceptance stamps on the bayonet and stock. I'm apprehencive about the possibility of a miss assembled bolt. Anyone know of a way to look @ the bolt and know it's been put together correctly? I've never had it apart. I suppose I could simply shoot it from the hip to make sure, but I'd prefer something less risky.

    Thanks in advance
    Talking about Ross accuracy in the same sentence as a MkII*** is pretty much like saying "Ford made some pretty fast racing cars in the past, so can I expect my 1971 Pick-up to go really fast and corner as well"?
    Check on FleaBay for a copy of "Sir Charles Ross and his Rifle"- usually around $10 plus shipping. It will show you most of the different variations.

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