+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Mauser 1895 Chilean Restoration Project

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Member clintdaniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last On
    05-13-2016 @ 08:50 PM
    Location
    United States
    Age
    68
    Posts
    3
    Local Date
    05-25-2020
    Local Time
    10:45 PM

    Mauser 1895 Chilean Restoration Project

    I own a 1895 Chileanicon Mauser which is in great shape and a good shooting rifle. I decided today to break it down and clean the metal and gently sand down the stock with 325 grit and then hand rub it with about 15 coats of boiled linseed oilicon. I just finished a Yugoicon M24/47 Mauser with a black walnut stock which came out to look like it was just released from the factory. It's beautiful. I was wondering if any of you know what kind of wood the 1895 Chilean Mauser was made from before I start my sanding so that I can tell everyone what I'm working with when the project starts tomorrow? Looks like walnut but lighter and softer?

    Thanks for any info!
    Information
    Warning: This is a relatively older thread
    This discussion is older than 360 days. Some information contained in it may no longer be current.

  2. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Location
    Milsurps.Com
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    All Threads
     

  3. #2
    Really Senior Member Aragorn243's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 03:53 PM
    Location
    Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts
    5,221
    Local Date
    05-25-2020
    Local Time
    10:45 PM
    Add Aragorn243 on Facebook
    Real Name
    Steve
    If the rifle is in great shape as you describe, I wouldn't sand it at all. Light cleaning and linseed oilicon are Ok but sanding is generally frowned upon. If it has dents which you are trying to remove, you could try steaming them out rather than sanding. I'm not saying I'm completely against sanding, you have to use your own judgement but I typically sand a stock only to correct something someone else did like sanding against the grain. Something like that you can't get rid of without sanding, but even then, I try to keep it to a minimum.

    As for wood, depends on the individual rifle. I have two, one is a dark color, possibly walnut but it has a reddish cast not typical of walnut, the other is a light color which could also be walnut or another type wood. They were produced in Germanyicon so the wood would most likely be an European type.

    Photos would help.

  4. Thank You to Aragorn243 For This Useful Post:


  5. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  6. #3
    Administrator

    Site Owner
    Badger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last On
    @
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Age
    72
    Posts
    12,445
    Local Date
    05-25-2020
    Local Time
    10:45 PM
    Follow Badger On Twitter Add Badger on Facebook Visit Badger's Youtube Channel
    Real Name
    Doug
    My Videos in Video Club
    12
    I don't know if this helps or not, by here is mine....

    It was the first milsurp I ever collected....

    1895 Mauser - Lowe

    Regards,
    Doug

  7. #4
    Really Senior Member Aragorn243's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 03:53 PM
    Location
    Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts
    5,221
    Local Date
    05-25-2020
    Local Time
    10:45 PM
    Add Aragorn243 on Facebook
    Real Name
    Steve
    Doug,

    Is that all the same rifle?

    The upper photos showing the entire rifle is what I believe my older 95 aspires to be. It was black with oil and dirt when I got it and repeated cleanings got it to a darker shade of the reddish color yours shows.

    However, the photo of the butt stock color is closer to the newer of my two 95's although I believe mine is a bit lighter still.

    I didn't even know my older one had a cartouche on it until I cleaned it. I've debated trying to clean it some more but it doesn't look bad as is.

    The one thing about it is it had a deep dent that actually forced the wood up around the edges. And this is where the sanding part comes in. I sanded that down to the same level as the rest of the wood. Only place on the entire rifle I used sandpaper and of course that one area is a light red compared to the dark red everywhere else. Lesson learned.

  8. #5
    Administrator

    Site Owner
    Badger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last On
    @
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Age
    72
    Posts
    12,445
    Local Date
    05-25-2020
    Local Time
    10:45 PM
    Follow Badger On Twitter Add Badger on Facebook Visit Badger's Youtube Channel
    Real Name
    Doug
    My Videos in Video Club
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn243 View Post
    Doug,

    Is that all the same rifle?
    Yup, all the same rifle....

    The pics aren't that great as they're the ones the seller sent me. I never got around to taking better quality or more detailed pics...

    Regards,
    Doug

  9. #6
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    Today @ 02:51 PM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,796
    Local Date
    05-26-2020
    Local Time
    04:45 AM

    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by clintdaniel View Post
    sand down the stock with 325 grit
    no no NO NO NO

    I presume it's really a joke, and you are just trying to wind me up.

    OK, you succeeded.

    Now go and do it properly. Search the restorers forum with the keyword "boning". Read, practise, and enjoy the result.

    And of course it's walnut. They didn't use anything else in those days. But walnut can vary from a light, almost beige color, to something that looks like old creosote-soaked railroad ties. My jay-noo-whine Boer carbine (1895 model, see Ball, appendix on ZAR rifles) also has a very light walnut stock.
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 04-09-2013 at 07:33 PM.

  10. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Patrick Chadwick For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    Today @ 02:51 PM
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,796
    Local Date
    05-26-2020
    Local Time
    04:45 AM

    It's all walnut

    Just to make the point:


    All European guns!
    Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	Roma-full-3[1].jpg‎
Views:	628
Size:	69.4 KB
ID:	41897   Click image for larger version

Name:	TreacleButtAfter[1].jpg‎
Views:	602
Size:	271.2 KB
ID:	41898   Click image for larger version

Name:	RightStripped.jpg‎
Views:	640
Size:	97.5 KB
ID:	41889   Click image for larger version

Name:	1349BoerCarbineRight.jpg‎
Views:	767
Size:	139.0 KB
ID:	41890   Click image for larger version

Name:	MidBand.JPG‎
Views:	231
Size:	164.1 KB
ID:	41891   Click image for larger version

Name:	ButtRight.JPG‎
Views:	303
Size:	231.9 KB
ID:	41892   Click image for larger version

Name:	HardWalnut.jpg‎
Views:	248
Size:	254.8 KB
ID:	41893  

    Click image for larger version

Name:	NATIONA2.jpg‎
Views:	239
Size:	68.7 KB
ID:	41894   Click image for larger version

Name:	Butt-Nr_1550.jpg‎
Views:	251
Size:	283.3 KB
ID:	41895  
    Last edited by Badger; 04-10-2013 at 06:19 AM. Reason: Why the target? - I don't know

  12. #8
    Member clintdaniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last On
    05-13-2016 @ 08:50 PM
    Location
    United States
    Age
    68
    Posts
    3
    Local Date
    05-25-2020
    Local Time
    10:45 PM
    Thread Starter

    1895 Chilean Mauser Restoration Project!

    Thank you all for your help. The gun really didn't need sanding and I guess I just was curious about what it would look like inside after I broke it down. It was clean and no cosmolineicon and the metal was really a nice blue steel so I just light sanded with 325 and did not go for taking out the dent (history in those dents) and will finish it with a light walnut stain and hand rubbed boiled linseed oilicon and it should look great. Hope all who own this gun enjoy shooting it as much as I do!

  13. #9
    Member clintdaniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last On
    05-13-2016 @ 08:50 PM
    Location
    United States
    Age
    68
    Posts
    3
    Local Date
    05-25-2020
    Local Time
    10:45 PM
    Thread Starter

    Mauser Restoration Project Discovered Cartouche Question?

    When I broke down my Chileanicon 1895 Mauser, I discovered the "Krupp" steel company three ring trademark on the top and under the wood handguard. I know that the rifles were made by Loewe, owner of the original Mauser Werke, in Germanyicon (home to Krupp steel). The 1895 Chilean Mauser was considered stronger with better metal than the 1893 Spanish Mauser and I think the metallurgy on German mausers is far from suspect. Does anybody know, given that the Krupp train wheel logo (three circles) was on my rifle, was it made with Krupp steel or was the logo designating the bayonet connection to Krupp who's steel went into the 1895 Chilean Mauser bayonet?


+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. 1895 Chilean Mauser Short Rifle Stock
    By mauser95 in forum Mauser Rifles
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-01-2012, 08:38 AM
  2. 1895 chilean mauser ????
    By OLDER THEN DIRT in forum Mauser Rifles
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-01-2011, 08:19 AM
  3. Chilean mauser 1895?
    By OLDER THEN DIRT in forum Mauser Rifles
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-19-2011, 01:25 PM
  4. Terrible shooting Lowe 1895 Chilean mauser
    By comet in forum Mauser Rifles
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-05-2011, 10:06 AM
  5. Disassembly of a 1895 Chilean Mauser long rifle ?
    By hephoto in forum Mauser Rifles
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-17-2010, 01:36 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts