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Thread: M1 Carbine - Would You Buy This??

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  1. #21
    Really Senior Member DaveHH's Avatar
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    In an environment full of fakes, shady dealers, and poorly assembled "Corrections" all overpriced, occasionally a filthy gem surfaces. I'd buy this thing in a hot minute. It has nice things, high wood, spring tube, dog leg hammer, and early parts. It hasn't been honked up by someone who thinks he knows what he is doing but really doesn't. It its genuine, honest, and we have no idea if it will clean up or how well it will shoot. It is infinitely better to my eye than a Sam-T-Bob special.

    I once owned a 1966 Porsche 911S. It had 60+ thousand miles, properly maintained with the cam chains, rear axles and carbs replaced. It had a crummy $200 paint job , cheap tires and a sand blasted windshield from desert driving. Inside the interior was perfect original black leather. It was perfect. You could drive it like crazy and not worry about anything. I thought that was the best $4K I ever spent. This carbine reminds me of that Porsche.


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  4. #22
    Really Senior Member Seaspriter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anton67 View Post
    The seller wants $2,000 for the rifle.
    About a year ago a close friend offered me an authentic arsenal rebuild (Korean War) 1943 Inland that was her father's complete with original bayonet, combat knife, and documentation of her father's service, etc. Everything was in good condition.

    I followed nearly a dozen GunBroker sales of similar weapons over the course of 4 months to determine fair market value -- I promised my friend I would pay fair market value, which was fine for her. I gave her all the pictures and sales prices of all the sales over that period of time to verify what I was willing to pay.

    My conclusion was between $1,000 and $1,100. While that number may seem low, it reflected actual sales of very good condition guns of similar configuration. Now, nearly a year later, prices have gone up, but there are still a lot of good M1icon Carbines for sale.

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  6. #23
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Sure I'd buy it, but not for very much.
    Regards, Jim

  7. #24
    Really Senior Member us019255's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Chadwick View Post
    Varnish? Dried oil? Crud? - All no problem.

    The foresight-muzzle area looks as if it is rusted. If the muzzle end of the barrel is rusted on the inside, then it is ruined as a shooter, and all the prettying-up on the outside will not help.
    .
    I will chime in from another standpoint-- a shooter who enjoys fixing old firearms. If the price is right, and I do not have any knowledge of current prices, why not buy it, replace the barrel with a new commercial barrel, reparkerize and have a nice shooter?? My personal defense carbine was made from a very pitted receiver, a new barrel, and the rest of the parts from another carbine with a cut, welded receiver and messed up barrel. Works great and I don't worry about ruining collector value.
    Ed reluctantly no longer in the Bitterroot

  8. #25
    Senior Member twh's Avatar
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    Is it just me or does it look like the varnish was slathered all over it to cover up the fact that it was nickel or silver plated at one time.

  9. #26
    Member Anton67's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    In an environment full of fakes, shady dealers, and poorly assembled "Corrections" all overpriced, occasionally a filthy gem surfaces. I'd buy this thing in a hot minute. It has nice things, high wood, spring tube, dog leg hammer, and early parts. It hasn't been honked up by someone who thinks he knows what he is doing but really doesn't. It its genuine, honest, and we have no idea if it will clean up or how well it will shoot. It is infinitely better to my eye than a Sam-T-Bob special.

    +1

    Well I decided to buy it. I got it for a lesser price.
    I also got a 5 day inspection/return policy.
    The seller also gave me license to attempt to remove the yellow.
    He said that if I tried to remove the yellow and was still not satisfied, I could return it within the 5 days.
    My thought is that it is a true original and with a little TLC I can bring it back to its glory.
    If not, I have nothing to lose.
    I took a chance like this once before.
    I picked up a D-Loop US WWII Helmet that had been painted gold by the Vet's son.
    If you do not know about helmets, the D-Loop is the most rare of US helmets from WWII.
    They are very expensive as they were used by paratroopers.
    I used "Goof Off" and rubbed the gold paint off with a cloth and my finger.
    Here are a few before and after shots.

    Anyway, now I am asking for suggestions for removal of the yellow.
    The seller said he thinks that it may be dried linseed oilicon.
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  11. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by INLAND44 View Post
    The gun is not worth the asking price. But it is a desirable piece. Most of what I see on it is Boiled linseed oilicon, Tung Oil or some other kind of varnish, easy to clean. Many stocks were cracked behind the recoil plate from shooting grenade-launcher rounds. The fix for that is easy, fast, cheap and permanent; take the recoil plate out - soak Super Glue into the crack for a few minutes until it reaches the point of refusal, when the stock has absorbed all it is going to and the crack is full of glue. The next day it's finished. Remove any excess SG with Acetone and replace the recoil plate. I would start the clean up with alcohol from the hardware store, not the drug store. Anything that doesn't get will require the Acetone. Do not use any abrasives, steel wool, etc. Wipe the stock down with the alcohol. I would not be thinking about any refinishing until it's all clean and you can see what it really is. Some areas sure look like rust. If areas of it are rusty, it may be necessary to refinish it. But you don't pay even $1000 for a carbine that should be refinished.
    Here you go. - Bob

  12. #28
    Senior Member twh's Avatar
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    Whether it is dried cosmolene or varnish you can use bronze wool and acetone. Once you get it off post a picture as I would like to see what it looks like under that gunk.

  13. #29
    Member Anton67's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you for the suggestions.
    I was going to try and refrain from any kind of abrasive.
    Will bronze wool scratch the park underneath?
    I saw an article where someone suggested using denatured alcohol.
    That must be what USGI is suggesting.

    OH and I will definitely post photos.

  14. #30
    Senior Member twh's Avatar
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    Very fine bronze wool and acetone should not impact the finnish

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