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  1. #1
    Contributing Member Flying10uk's Avatar
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    An "Airborne No32 sniper"

    Here we apparently have a No32 sniper scope and, according to the vendor, it is rare and as used by airborne forces.

    It's near the bottom of the page.



    http://www.clementsmilitaria.com/shop.php

    Is it not just a "normal" No32 scope?

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    Really Senior Member Alan de Enfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying10uk View Post
    Here we apparently have a No32 sniper scope and, according to the vendor, it is rare and as used by airborne forces.

    It's near the bottom of the page.

    http://www.clementsmilitaria.com/shop.php

    Is it not just a "normal" No32 scope?
    My No4T (complete with scope and CES) is an RAF issue - would this be classed as an 'airborne' rifle ?

    Last 'serviced / overhauled' by 34th Base Workshops Catterick Sept 1968
    Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

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    Mine are not the best, but they are not too bad. I can think of lots of Enfields I'd rather have but instead of constantly striving for more, sometimes it's good to be satisfied with what one has...

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    Really Senior Member Seaforth72's Avatar
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    I do not know the seller, but it appears that they like to use the word “airborne” a little loosely. If the scope has provenance of airborne use, that should be provided.

    I have an actual “airborne” No.32 Mk. I, but it is completely standard. Mine came from Pte. George Siggs of 1 Canadianicon Parachute Battalion and it was a WWII souvenir of his. I have owned quite a lot of WWII airborne kit, quite a few No.4 (T) rifles, No.32, C No. 32 and C No.67 scopes and I have never come across any mention of any being special versions for airborne use. Mine is the only one that I know of that has airborne provenance, though there may be a few others. E.g. A sniper rifle was found at Arnhem hidden in a wall as I recall but I do not know if it had a scope with it. Sadly I suspect that well over 99% of No.32 scopes have no known detailed history (beyond country of manufacture and possibly country of use) and some even have invented “histories”.
    Last edited by Seaforth72; 03-03-2019 at 12:42 AM.

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    Contributing Member Flying10uk's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    I've never heard of the term "airborne" being applied to a scope before but then I wouldn't describe myself as being any sort of scope expert.

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    Sorry to burst the bubble, but as far as I know the only things that were unique to us Paratroopers were the helmet/Smock and other obje da like the fold up motorbike etc.

    They never made a purpose built scope or 4T rifle for paratroopers, and I am sure Peter will bear me out on that, you got what you were issued with and you looked after it in a padded/hessian bag which was tied to your bergen around your legs as per SOP.
    'Tonight my men and I have been through hell and back again, but the look on your faces when we let you out of the hall - we'd do it all again tomorrow.' Major Chris Keeble's words to Goose Green villagers on 29th May 1982 - 2 PARA

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    Contributing Member boltaction's Avatar
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    I think the only "airborne" stuff associated with that scope is the horses*** flying in the description.

    Ed

    ---------- Post added at 06:06 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:03 AM ----------

    Maybe it is because it was transported by air at some point.

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    Contributing Member Flying10uk's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies.

    I wondered if anyone with "airborne" experience could explain how the UKicon/Commonwealth airforces would go about dropping a sniper's rifle on a drop, please? Would the scope stay on the rifle or be removed for the drop? Would the rifle and scope be dropped with the sniper or would the rifle and scope be packed in a container and dropped separately? If the rifle and sniper are dropped separately then there is a possibility of having a sniper without a rifle or having a rifle without a sniper. But if the rifle and scope is dropped with the sniper how is the rifle and scope protected from damage during the drop?

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    Really Senior Member GeeRam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying10uk View Post
    Thanks for the replies.

    I wondered if anyone with "airborne" experience could explain how the UKicon/Commonwealth airforces would go about dropping a sniper's rifle on a drop, please? Would the scope stay on the rifle or be removed for the drop? Would the rifle and scope be dropped with the sniper or would the rifle and scope be packed in a container and dropped separately? If the rifle and sniper are dropped separately then there is a possibility of having a sniper without a rifle or having a rifle without a sniper. But if the rifle and scope is dropped with the sniper how is the rifle and scope protected from damage during the drop?
    By the time of the 4T in widespread use, IIRC, the padded drop valise for the No.4 had been introduced. A padded valise, with a drop cord so rifle would have gone with the sniper and likely, scope in the tin, or more likely in the canvas scope container.

    ---------- Post added at 08:27 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:25 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Gil Boyd View Post
    Sorry to burst the bubble, but as far as I know the only things that were unique to us Paratroopers were the helmet/Smock and other obje da like the fold up motorbike etc.
    And Trousers, Parachutist 1942 Pattern

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    Lots of special containers for the parachutists, eg radios, medical, mortar and other sights, etc. One small sight in your own pack or padded with you. It is your only firearm you are dropping with after all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying10uk View Post
    anyone with "airborne" experience could explain how the UKicon/Commonwealth airforces would go about dropping a sniper's rifle on a drop
    A simple padded case and do your best to protect the rifle. We jump with our weapons. It comes down with you on a lowering rope and strikes the ground before you...with the rest of your kit. The days of separate weapons containers are over.
    Regards, Jim

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