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  1. #31
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Laidlericon View Post
    Someone showed me how to use an old tea bag
    Another thing I had forgotten. An Aussie advisor showed us that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Laidler View Post
    the small tubes of 'milk' that looked like a thick creamy car polish
    It was referred to as a "Dairy spread" and thick, oversweet.

    What about the caramel bars or the chocolate that was meant to be dissolved in hot water? Eaten like a chocolate bar it tasted like dirt...out on patrol around Tin Can Bay...
    Regards, Jim

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  3. #32
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    Peter Laidler's Avatar
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    That chocolate in our ration packs......., sorry to go off at a tangent again........ was said to be salt-free. So that it was just the sugar and cocoa part for energy but less the salt so that it wouldn't make you thirsty afterwards. Made by Cadbury and Jamiesons in Dundee or Glasgow (anyone????) on contract as 'lifeboat or aircraft' survival rations. Rowntree made some special bars of YORKIE chocolate for our packs with NOT FOR CIVVIES printed across the wrapper!!!!!

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  6. #33
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Yes, we appear to be drifting here...
    Regards, Jim

  7. #34
    Contributing Member muffett.2008's Avatar
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    Driftings good, old memories spark tired brains....and that keeps us healthy, not so much the ration packs though.

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  9. #35
    Contributing Member 22SqnRAE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by browningautorifleicon View Post
    Another thing I had forgotten. An Aussie advisor showed us that...



    It was referred to as a "Dairy spread" and thick, oversweet.

    What about the caramel bars or the chocolate that was meant to be dissolved in hot water? Eaten like a chocolate bar it tasted like dirt...out on patrol around Tin Can Bay...
    I believe that was probably the unsweetened condensed milk.

    Prior to joining the Army, I only ever drank black tea. Most farmers did where I came from. After needing the sugar kick form the brew that was taken where and when, I kinda became hooked on the white tea idea.

    Sad, but true. As awful as much of the Rat Pack was, it somehow gets ingrained in you. That's my excuse, and I'm sticking to it...
    Last edited by 22SqnRAE; 07-31-2019 at 06:28 PM. Reason: Grammar and Spelling
    Trying to save Service history, one rifle at a time...

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  11. #36
    Really Senior Member Bruce_in_Oz's Avatar
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    A fair while ago, there was some discussion regarding "Scotchbrite" pads .

    I'll reprise my version of the "caveat":

    The REAL stuff is made by 3M, of "carborundum" and sticky-tape fame.

    The reason the curly stuff in a Scotchbrite pad works so well on the cooking gear is that, embedded in the little nodules on the spun fibre, are particles of Silicon Carbide.

    It will remove commercial blueing almost instantly, will cut into Parkerizing and leave clear scratches on hard-chromed bits like L1A1 gas plugs and pistons. It will certainly scrub hardened crud from woodwork, but use pads that no longer make the grade in the kitchen; you'll do a lot less mischief to wood and metal. Be careful with solvents, as well. The synthetic sponge backing on some may dissolve when doused in some of the more evil hydrocarbons out there. (Your lungs? Ditto!)

    Bronze or stainless-steed wool are preferred for working with wood. Any fibres that end up embedded in open-grained timber will not corrode and leave an interesting reddish purple stain where the fibre is hiding.

    The "REAL DEAL" on older stuff is linseed oilicon, not some magic synthetic brew. Rifles in actual service were not "tarted up" like a Weatherby! Dull, dull. dull was the ideal finish on the two-way rifle range, for obvious reasons.

    My experience with actual, Service, (RAAF Cadets), SMLES is not all encompassing, but the ones I shot and drilled with back in the early 1970's had dull and fading metal finish. The woodwork was almost BLACK, mainly from the grime from a million grubby paws drilling AND shooting, as well as literally "hand-rubbing" in the "oil, du jour", which was often, as I recall, OX52icon? or some-such, and occasionally, an "update" to the linseed.

    My last "exciting" encounter with issue linseed oilicon was about a decade ago; I was doing "annual tech inspections" on a big batch of F88s (Oz AUGs) and one was impossible to "clear" before inspection. Some goose in the Q store had issued LINSEED oil to a Digger who merrily slathered it all over the metal bits of his "plastic fantastic" before reassembly, after which it was duly placed on a rack in a warm, humidity-controlled armoury, for several months. NOBODY picked up the distinctly different smell of the Linseed oil.

    I ended up using "Carburetor and Throttle-body cleaner" to get that one apart.

    So, final note: Make it a rule to keep "wood oils" away from the metal bits, and "gun-oil" off the nice woodwork. Unless you have a hankering for the "good-old days" of OX-52 or your local equivalent.
    Last edited by Bruce_in_Oz; 09-08-2019 at 08:40 AM.

  12. #37
    Member Frank46's Avatar
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    Minwax makes a wood conditioner that preps the wood prior to applying the stain. From what I remember it allows the stain to be applied evenly in the wood. Frank

  13. #38
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce_in_Oz View Post
    Some goose in the Q store had issued linseed oilicon to a Digger who merrily slathered it all over the metal bits of his "plastic fantastic" before reassembly, after which it was duly placed on a rack in a warm, humidity-controlled armoury, for several months.
    You aren't the only one, there was a clown issuing it as "Oil" to the troops at one point for rifle cleaning. Thought it was just another type of oil. That causes another comprehensive cleaning session immediately...
    Regards, Jim

  14. #39
    Senior Member bombdoc's Avatar
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    Ahem... there is ONE time that you use linseed oilicon on metal...!



    This is when you are finishing damascus barrels using the old rust brown method.. Once you have been around the coat, damp and card off buoy a few times you dunk the barrel into a solution of logwood to darken the stain. After finally drying off the barrel, the traditional last finish is boiled linseed oilicon! This has the effect of filling the pores in the barrel and stopping any moisture getting in. It also smooths off the slightly rough finish and leave a nice shiny effect. It must be let alone to set for a week or so, and then can be oiled in the usual manner...!

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