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  1. #1
    Contributing Member Flying10uk's Avatar
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    British Mine Detector post WW2

    I picked up this Britishicon mine detector at a militaria fair a couple of years ago because it looked interesting and it was reasonably priced. I don't really know much about it other than it's British and post WW2. I have no idea if it is in working order or not. It seems like a heavy thing to hold for any length of time.

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  4. #2
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Well, it LOOKS like the ones we had, I thought ours were US castoff. Not too sure as I didn't have the Pioneer course. We were issued for a range cleanup in 1981 and used them for a week or so... Yes, they are a bit awkward but so is much of our gear. Example, the handle should have folded up from the other direction and it would have been easier to keep in position... You can buy simple metal detectors now that are head and shoulders beyond these. Does this not use a couple of "D" cells?
    Regards, Jim

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  7. #3
    Contributing Member Flying10uk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by browningautorifleicon View Post
    Does this not use a couple of "D" cells?
    It may do Jim, I'm not sure what batteries it's supposed to use.

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    Contributing Member WarPig1976's Avatar
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    This monster compared to what’s available nowadays is like comparing the first computer to a “Smart” phone of today.
    I’d be curious as to it’s capabilities just for the fun of it.

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    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarPig1976 View Post
    I’d be curious as to it’s capabilities just for the fun of it.
    When we were using them, they didn't do much at all. Sometimes couldn't "Smell" a shell when you held it to one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying10uk View Post
    I'm not sure what batteries it's supposed to use.
    Here's a clipping from IMA says 9 volt batteries. Dating from the time of the Cold War (1960’s) these were the standard Mine Detector for the Britishicon Army in the 1960s and later. Officially known as the Mine Detector No 4c, each runs on 9-volt batteries (not included).

    Link so you can read all for yourself... https://www.ima-usa.com/products/ori...nt=26157169605

    I think they go into the box after removing those proud screws... Then I stole the picture appropriate...
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    Regards, Jim

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    Yes, modified from the old WW2 valve driven UKicon spec Detector, Mine Mk5 which was transistorised to run on 9v instead of the dual volt valve set type*. I don't think that the one shown is a UK version due to the 66 VAOS number (ours were 99) Our search coils had 2 settings too, PAVE and GROUND - for roads and other stuff.

    I borrowed one of those in the 70's to help a group of aircraft people to search for the wreckage of a Liberator near to Shefford Woodlands near Newbury because so said, it would search deeper than the usual civvy stuff of the era. All we found were loads of bits that were found to be the remains of a troop carrying glider that cut its tow, and smashed itself to smithereens as it came to land, hitting some trees as it did. Some rusty rifles, radios, a pistol still in the holster - all rusted solid.

    Ours, as I seem to recall, ran in 2x brown, square batteries with screw threaded terminals. Batteries were 1.5 x 1.5 x 5" deep with central earth terminal and the live terminal at one corner. Same as used in the Vickers GAP set-up. That's all I remember about them. Repaired by the CET's - or control equipment teccies

    I think the original ran on 120volts DC - as per the old home valve radios of the era

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    Really Senior Member Roy W's Avatar
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    Still in use late 80's early 90's and part of the standard Royal Engineers G1098 Stores.

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    Thanks for all of the replies chaps. It looks like, from the terminals, that I need to try the little 9 volt battery commonly used in smoke detectors in the UKicon.

  16. #9
    Advisory Panel browningautorifle's Avatar
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    I would have been surprised if Peter hadn't had to handle these, or maybe it was your version of the ELM techs that did it... One of you would have to inspect them though.
    Regards, Jim

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    Senior Member old tanker's Avatar
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    Road clearing operations were common missions in Viet Nam. Engineers would often be assigned and were commonly equipped P-153 mine detectors. AN/PRS-4 detectors were universally despised as to difficult to keep adjusted and difficult to use with soils that were rocky, although they were touted as being capable of finding both metalic and non-metallic mines.. The metallic mine detectors were simpler, but on roads which had seen combat since the days of the Japaneseicon occupation, shrapnel, brass, machine gun links all worked to confuse the operator. Another factor was the common bamboo trigger switch used by the VC had little metal in it and it took an attentive operator to find one. Lastly, the sweepers should have been switched out at 20 minute intervals to keep them from going "tone deaf."

    DETECTION AND AVOIDANCE OF MINES AND BOOBYTRAPS (1968)

    The tank made a pretty good mine detector, if they were not huge. However, much to the dismay of truck drivers, wheeled vehicles exert a ground pressure equal to their tire pressure. The M48 tank only exerts 11 pounds per square foot. Quite often trucks would set off mines tanks had not.
    Last edited by old tanker; 08-26-2019 at 10:03 PM.

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