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  1. #11
    Advisory Panel Surpmil's Avatar
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    I don't have the book, it's a scan held at Internet Archive: Digital Library of Free Wayback Machine.

    There's nothing in the nominal roll on p.267 that suggests he was wounded and he's not mentioned anywhere else according to the search engine on that site. The roll is a bit confusing but if one goes back to the first page it is stated to be a list of all those who served in S.A. and the blanks after names thus indicate no record rather than a "ditto" effect.

    As far as I can see Stenson came through unscathed. He must have been lucky or smart enough to avoid dirty water or other contaminations that led to the "enteric fever" which killed about as many as combat.

    Around this time the Japaneseicon were getting very interested in those famous (Royal) Doulton ceramic water filters which the WO seems to have overlooked - and which are still in use today of course. Gen. Ishi of Unit 731 infamy got his start in this field IIRC. The Japanese eventually found ways to pump the water through the filter media rather than just using gravity feed which increased the output enough to make it useful in the field.

    But getting back to Stenson, I found no clear trace of him after the war. If you can access records of the 18th through the museum of The Royal Hussars or whatever the successor regiment is, you might find out what became of him. The fact that such an object was still in the UKicon suggests he didn't emigrate, but it's also the kind of thing that was often "sent home" to relations when an emigrant died somewhere abroad.

    (Many keyboards have a "print screen" key which temporarily saves a "screen shot", which can then be pasted directly into MS Paint or another image manipulation program for further editing and saving under whatever name one chooses.)
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    "Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened." W.L.S.C..

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  3. #12
    Advisory Panel Surpmil's Avatar
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    Here's the real story: 48 men KIA or DoW and 49 dead of disease.

    214 sent home due to disease!

    That was the true scandal of the war.

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    Last edited by Surpmil; 03-27-2020 at 03:04 PM.
    "Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened." W.L.S.C..

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  5. #13
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    Thanks for all of that hard work.
    I have indeed emailed a Roberta Goldsmith, Curator of the Light Dragoons Museum who will respond when she is back at work. She came back to me initially and told to look at Ancestry.com which I know has the bearest of details on it, ie medals and name, it also had his first name missing just showed an F so I asked her for that specifically so I could search for his grave and that might throw up more info.
    Anyway, thansk so far and I'll keep you updated
    'Tonight my men and I have been through hell and back again, but the look on your faces when we let you out of the hall - we'd do it all again tomorrow.' Major Chris Keeble's words to Goose Green villagers on 29th May 1982 - 2 PARA

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    Advisory Panel Surpmil's Avatar
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    It was nothing but fun and the work of minutes!

    With the first name and initial at least it would be much easier to track him down, definitely.
    "Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened." W.L.S.C..

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    Really Senior Member Paul S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surpmil View Post
    Here's the real story: 48 men KIA or DoW and 49 dead of disease.

    214 sent home due to disease!

    That was the true scandal of the war.
    Correction: '214 sent home due to wounds or disease!'

    Remember too, that this was decades before the discovery of penicillin. Antibiotics had not been discovered. Back then, diseases such as malaria,, typhus, cholera, and dysentery were common, particularly in military camps in which hygiene was often 'spotty'.

    A true perspective of 'disease casualty rates' and the advancement of military medicine and sanitation comes from looking at the numbers and percentages from the Crimean War and the US Civil War, and then WWI and WWII.
    Last edited by Paul S.; 03-27-2020 at 11:00 PM.

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    I note nothing mentioned about sexually transmitted diseases, but those in themselves took tally for many a soldier abroad. I saw close up a Doctors kit from those times, and blimey not something you would want to use, without a general aneasthetic.
    Reminds me as a young soldier being played the Syphillis video from the U.S. on men returning from Vietnam, whilst we were in Malaya, no comparison I know, but it was meant to shock us, and it certainly had an effect.
    I went straight down to Jahore Bahru that night with a bunch of mates and had a bloody good massage!
    'Tonight my men and I have been through hell and back again, but the look on your faces when we let you out of the hall - we'd do it all again tomorrow.' Major Chris Keeble's words to Goose Green villagers on 29th May 1982 - 2 PARA

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul S. View Post
    Correction: '214 sent home due to wounds or disease!'

    Remember too, that this was decades before the discovery of penicillin. Antibiotics had not been discovered. Back then, diseases such as malaria,, typhus, cholera, and dysentery were common, particularly in military camps in which hygiene was often 'spotty'.

    A true perspective of 'disease casualty rates' and the advancement of military medicine and sanitation comes from looking at the numbers and percentages from the Crimean War and the US Civil War, and then WWI and WWII.
    Good catch on the numbers, but the diagnosis remains the same: generalized obtusity and catastrophic unpreparedness.

    As for military camps, very topical considering the 1918-19 "Spanish Flu" and it's mysterious origins: one interesting theory. It may or may well not be relevant, but there were about 100,000 men of the Chinese Labour Corps in Franceicon IIRC.

    Certainly there has been a slow continuum of improvement since the US Civil War for example. At the same time, I'm personally convinced that there are many herbals that are highly effective, and as far as war was concerned sadly a great many men and limbs could probably have been saved that weren't.

    I don't believe the authorities ever accepted the fact, but there's plenty of evidence that malaria was found in certain regions of NW France in 1917-18 and maybe earlier. It's been suggested it came with the Indian Army Corps in 1915, but there were so many Britishicon reservists who had served in India there as well probably no one could say where it came from.
    "Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened." W.L.S.C..

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    Really Senior Member Paul S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surpmil View Post
    Good catch on the numbers, but the diagnosis remains the same: generalized obtusity and catastrophic unpreparedness.

    As for military camps, very topical considering the 1918-19 "Spanish Flu" and it's mysterious origins: one interesting theory. It may or may well not be relevant, but there were about 100,000 men of the Chinese Labour Corps in France IIRC.

    Certainly there has been a slow continuum of improvement since the US Civil War for example. At the same time, I'm personally convinced that there are many herbals that are highly effective, and as far as war was concerned sadly a great many men and limbs could probably have been saved that weren't.

    I don't believe the authorities ever accepted the fact, but there's plenty of evidence that malaria was found in certain regions of NW France in 1917-18 and maybe earlier. It's been suggested it came with the Indian Army Corps in 1915, but there were so many Britishicon reservists who had served in India there as well probably no one could say where it came from.
    RE: Malaria -- One needs to remember that there were also African troops serving with the British and Frenchicon forces. Much of the ANZAC in 1916 had just come from Egypt, Gallipoli, and Palestine as well. Some BEF battalions (regulars) also had been on service in India and elsewhere before going to France. As for AEF, the late arrivals, Malaria, while not common, was also a problem in the US at that, pre-DDT, time.

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