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  1. #11
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    I'd not heard of alkanet I'm ashamed to say, but I'm going to get a packet & do a little experimenting this summer. It seems to be readily available on that internet auction site......

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    Brian, Joe LeCouffe told me he had read (of course could not remember the source) that during WWII, beet juice was added to the hot linseed oilicon baths. For what it is worth. best, p.

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  6. #13
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    Anything is possible in a pinch I reckon! It would certainly work.

  7. #14
    Senior Member bombdoc's Avatar
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    This is the stuff I use.. seems to work and you are not mucking about with powder etc...

    Trade Secret Alkanet Oil - John Knibbs International Ltd

    I have used trade secrets products for many years, and have always been pleased with the result!

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  9. #15
    Member Patt14 No2's Avatar
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    Here is another supplier

    Here is another supplier in the UKicon

    Gunguard Alkanet root

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  11. #16
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    A master firearm restoration person I met in the UKicon that does this for a living told me to;

    1. Fill a container with Alkanet root chips.
    2. Add pure raw linseed oilicon until the root is covered
    3. seal the jar up and let it sit for a month, shaking it daily.

    On the other hand; The formula from The Modern Gunsmith published in 1941 (not so modern) is;
    "
    1 pint raw linseed oilicon
    1 oz. Alkanet root
    30 cc. turpentine
    200 gr. lampblack

    Boil these, taking care that the turpentine does not come in contact with the fame, or it will ignite. Let cool, and apply to the stock once every two days, until the wood ceases to absorb any more. Let stand for one week and polish first with No. 3/0 steel wool and then with rottenstone on a rubber pad or sponge. The stock will now have a wonderfully pleasing appearance, as the color will come out with the real antique tone which everyone admires." (Howe, 1941)

    I have since modified the first formula by making and using Polymerized Linseed Oil which drys faster. PM me and I will send you the instruction for making Polymerized Linseed Oil.

    Your choice of methods. But either way, you don't slop this stuff on. Put a few drops on the palm of your hand and rub it into the stock, the oil will get warm while you rub it in which helps activate and set the oil. After a few hours, put a little of the oil on a clean rag and rub it in the stock. With the same rag rub the stock with a lot of pressure until its dry then just rub it clean with your hands. Let it set another two or three hours and repeat.
    Last edited by usabaker; 06-01-2020 at 03:55 PM.
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  13. #17
    Contributing Member WarPig1976's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by usabaker View Post
    A master firearm restoration person I met in the UKicon that does this for a living told me to;
    The poor fellow needs to get with the times.

    Alkanet is nothing but a cheap pigment. Nowadays we can get them in any color under the sun in powdered or liquid form. One can add them to Lacquer, Shellac, Oil's very easily without the witches brew nonsense.

  14. #18
    Contributing Member usabaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarPig1976 View Post
    Oil's very easily without the witches brew nonsense.
    You have a point and IF you did not care to perform a restoration of a firearm to as near as original as possible then by all means have fun with the chemicals. But restoration doing is as little as possible to the article and matching what exists to as near as possible, it would not be called restoration otherwise. I would not Purdey sidelock shotgun, slap a little Minwax stain on it, some BLOicon or Poly, and call it good. Craftsman made that shotgun and it should restored the same way.
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  15. #19
    Contributing Member WarPig1976's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by usabaker View Post
    You have a point and IF you did not care to perform a restoration of a firearm to as near as original as possible then by all means have fun with the chemicals.
    Uh-huh, everybody's a "restorer" until they have a Jap stock to turnout. Urushi turns us all into a bubba I suppose.


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