+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: This is why you fully inspect your new rifle...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #21
    Senior Member tatou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last On
    10-19-2020 @ 01:48 PM
    Posts
    113
    Local Date
    10-31-2020
    Local Time
    03:30 AM
    Thread Starter
    Awesome, thank you guys for the great explanations. Wont make me a better welder but it does help a lot in understanding what is going on.
    Cheers

  2. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Posts
    All Threads
    Banner AD Space Available - Click HERE to Inquire Family owned and operated since 1962, Simpson LTD is the largest collector firearms store in the Midwest. Our globally sourced inventory represents many eras, with an emphasis on World War II and our favorite firearm, the Luger, of which we typically have 2,500 in stock.  Inventory changes daily with 10,000 firearms ready to ship; along with accessories, militaria, and hundreds of book titles. We also offer appraisals, consignment services ranging from single items to full collections, and we are one of the most reliable and competitively priced import and export services available.  We do not offer parts or gunsmithing, but we have a little bit of everything else. Visit our website for more information and our new technical video series Speaking Luger, and like Simpson Ltd on Facebook for updates, previews, and more. LIMITED TIME OFFER FROM THE AMERICAN GUNSMITHING INSTITUTE: Get Immediate Online Access To AGI's NEW Armorer's Course for Glock Pistols, Covering Every Generation of Glocks, Including the Latest Model 42/43 and Double Stack Pistols for ONLY $7.00! Brian Dick ... BDL Ltd. - Specializing in British and Commonwealth weapons Chuck in Denver ... Buy-Sell-Trade .. Guns, Cars Motorcycles Your source for the finest in High Power Competition Gear. Here at T-bones Shipwrighting we specialise in vintage service rifle: re-barrelling, bedding, repairs, modifications and accurizing. We also provide importation services for firearms, parts and weapons, for both private or commercial businesses. Banner AD Space Available - Click HERE to Inquire
     

  3. #22
    Advisory Panel Surpmil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Last On
    @
    Location
    West side
    Posts
    3,483
    Local Date
    10-31-2020
    Local Time
    12:30 AM
    The other advantage of brazing is that the lower temperature of the brazing metal means there is usually no possibility of actually melting or distorting the pieces being joined, as there is in arc welding, nor the kind of instant contraction / "pulling" that makes it a bit of an art to maintain the relative positions of pieces being arc welded.

    I'd have to disagree slightly that the depth of weld is limited to the depth of the weld pool, unless one means in each pass over the joint; one usually makes several passes over larger or deeper joints.

    Or that welding inherently involves only fusing together the original metal of the parts being joined: only forge-welding does not involve the addition of new metal to the joint.

    Brazed or gas welded joints are also generally much neater, and less obtrusive or likely to require treatment with a "welder's eraser".
    Last edited by Surpmil; 09-28-2020 at 02:07 AM.
    "Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened." W.L.S.C..

  4. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Surpmil For This Useful Post:


  5. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  6. #23
    Senior Member bombdoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 06:03 AM
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    158
    Local Date
    10-31-2020
    Local Time
    07:30 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by Surpmil View Post
    The other advantage of brazing is that the lower temperature of the brazing metal means there is usually no possibility of actually melting or distorting the pieces being joined, as there is in arc welding, nor the kind of instant contraction / "pulling" that makes it a bit of an art to maintain the relative positions of pieces being arc welded.

    I'd have to disagree slightly that the depth of weld is limited to the depth of the weld pool, unless one means in each pass over the joint; one usually makes several passes over larger or deeper joints.

    Or that welding inherently involves only fusing together the original metal of the parts being joined: only forge-welding does not involve the addition of new metal to the joint.

    Brazed or gas welded joints are also generally much neater, and less obtrusive or likely to require treatment with a "welder's eraser".
    The point I was trying to make was that in brazing, the fusion between the original parts and the braze material is a surface alloying process whereas in welding, the metal of the original part has to be melted and becomes part of the joint. This has two consequences, in that in a braise, the physical structure of the original part is only slightly affected (you can still get distortion!) but that the surface of the joint can be much larger due to the jointing material flowing by capillary action through the joint. In a weld this does not happen as the surface tension of the liquid in the weld pool keeps it local, and the depth of fusion in the weld is not much greater than the depth of the pool. As you point out, this is why, where a deep weld is required, multiple passes are required. A weld always results in the physical dimensions of the original part being changed, both from heating effects and as a result of liquification of the original structure..

    It is possible to create welds without adding filler, known as "autonomous welds" but only in a limited number of weld types such as outside welds in thin metal or where a weld can be run along the edge of a double flange. Autonomous welds are sometimes designed when welding exotic materials where adding a different filler metal would be an issue.



    Most of my welding is using TIG, which I consider to be the best method for gunsmithing. It is as precise as gas welding, but without the need to give houseroom to acetylene, which often upsets insurance companies! You can also use TIG for brazing, although the filler rods are expensive. The only better technology is laser welding, which is a bit outside my budget!

    Most common weld fillers for steel are low carbon. eutectic alloys that end up as fairly soft mild steel. You end up with a reasonably tough join, however it can be a bit soft for bearing surfaces. If you are doing welds to build up worn or damaged surfaces you might want to think about using one of the more specialised fillers or case hardening after dressing the weld.

  7. The Following 3 Members Say Thank You to bombdoc For This Useful Post:


  8. #24
    Advisory Panel Surpmil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Last On
    @
    Location
    West side
    Posts
    3,483
    Local Date
    10-31-2020
    Local Time
    12:30 AM
    I've just picked up a TIG, so it's going to be interesting to play around with. A garage sale here just yielded a full mid-sized bottle of acet., an O2 bottle, hoses, and and a nickel-plated Smith's oxy-acet torch, all for a tenner. Less than the deposit on one of the bottles now; though have no need of either I'll use the acet. and take them back for the deposits. I should get some propane tips really, especially for tasks like burning off powder-coating and stubborn accumulations of paint and dirt. A touch of air burns all such stuff off beautifully, but when one has to pay for the gasses it gets expensive quickly!

    "hard facing rod" was what they used to call the sticks for wearing surfaces here.

    ' Enjoyed the chat.

    "Let sleeping insurors lie" I always say.
    Last edited by Surpmil; 09-29-2020 at 12:09 PM.
    "Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened." W.L.S.C..

  9. Thank You to Surpmil For This Useful Post:


+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Similar Threads

  1. The M1 Carbine concept fully developed
    By imarangemaster in forum M1/M2 Carbine
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 12-18-2018, 10:45 AM
  2. Inspect those used revolvers carefully.
    By WarPig1976 in forum Milsurps General Discussion Forum
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 05-14-2015, 12:45 PM
  3. What does FTR fully mean?
    By RJW NZ in forum The Lee Enfield Knowledge Library Collectors Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-17-2012, 06:55 AM
  4. Fully Functioning Sniper Rifle
    By Alan de Enfield in forum The Lee Enfield Knowledge Library Collectors Forum
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-14-2010, 04:24 AM
  5. Inspect your Garands from CMP when you get them.
    By Gus Fisher in forum M1 Garand/M14/M1A Rifles
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 06-21-2009, 07:48 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts