+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Soaking old stocks in kersoene to remove years of diet, oil, grease, etc.

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Legacy Member 1903Collector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Last On
    11-19-2022 @ 06:13 PM
    Location
    3rd Rock from the Sun, northern half of the western hemisphere, USA, Texas, Highland Village
    Posts
    177
    Real Name
    David Minick
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    05:33 AM

    Soaking old stocks in kersoene to remove years of diet, oil, grease, etc.

    I am looking for constructive comments and informed critique to an old practice used to clean dirty, dusty, greasy, grimy, oil stained, sweat stained and just plain well "used" wood stocks to military long arms up to 150s year old.

    Ive been soaking old stocks in kerosene to remove years of dirt, oil, grease, etc. for many years with very good success. Note that my intention is to return the work pieces to bare untreated wood since the original finish is long gone. Some preparation is often required to remove cosmolineicon and excessive and loose grime. A certain amount of brushing with soft bristle brush is often needed, but Ive noted no bad effects of the wood. There have been no issues with repairs that require glue of any kind and the stocks take staining when used (dont use it unless is was used by the military). I never sand wood stocks and the kerosene soak does not seem to effect the pores of the grain. Once dried the wood often takes on a faded gray tint. When I apply BLOicon (to all but the Russianicon Mosin Nagant, which were originally left looking rather dry) the original color of the wood blooms, the color darkens and the effect is remarkable. Ive recovered some nasty looking stocks over the years. I dont try to take out dents, nor make the stock look new, just a hard used rifle well cared for (all things considered) and for the most part, I seem to achieve jut that!

    Ive seen a few articles discounting the use of kerosene, but Ive also seen continued accounts of the use of the long disproven application of oven cleaner. Ive even seen accounts of placing stocks in dishwashers (but no comment of the cleaner used).

    So what facts, good or bad are available about applicability of kerosene for cleaning old wood stocks? What other methods are considered better or "correct"? Ive got three new projects on stocks over 00 years old each. If there is a better way, Id like to hear of it and consider it for use on these projects.

  2. # ADS
    Friends and Sponsors
    Join Date
    October 2006
    Location
    Milsurps.Com
    Posts
    All Threads
    A Collector's View - The SMLE Short Magazine Lee Enfield 1903-1989. It is 300 8.5x11 inch pages with 1,000+ photo’s, most in color, and each book is serial-numbered.  Covering the SMLE from 1903 to the end of production in India in 1989 it looks at how each model differs and manufacturer differences from a collecting point of view along with the major accessories that could be attached to the rifle. For the record this is not a moneymaker, I hope just to break even, eventually, at $80/book plus shipping.  In the USA shipping is $5.00 for media mail.  I will accept PayPal, Zelle, MO and good old checks (and cash if you want to stop by for a tour!).  CLICK BANNER to send me a PM for International pricing and shipping. Manufacturer of various vintage rifle scopes for the 1903 such as our M73G4 (reproduction of the Weaver 330C) and Malcolm 8X Gen II (Unertl reproduction). Several of our scopes are used in the CMP Vintage Sniper competition on top of 1903 rifles. Brian Dick ... BDL Ltd. - Specializing in British and Commonwealth weapons Chuck in Denver ... Buy-Sell-Trade .. Guns, Cars Motorcycles Your source for the finest in High Power Competition Gear. Here at T-bones Shipwrighting we specialise in vintage service rifle: re-barrelling, bedding, repairs, modifications and accurizing. We also provide importation services for firearms, parts and weapons, for both private or commercial businesses.
     

  3. #2
    Legacy Member Bruce_in_Oz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last On
    Today @ 01:39 AM
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,177
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    09:33 PM
    This bloke has a few clues on stock work:





    DAYS of educational videos

  4. Avoid Ads - Become a Contributing Member - Click HERE
  5. #3
    Contributing Member Woodsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Last On
    02-05-2023 @ 06:54 PM
    Location
    Central Otago, New Zealand
    Posts
    373
    Real Name
    Rod
    Local Date
    02-09-2023
    Local Time
    12:33 AM
    What I have done with great success over the years is to go over the stock (stripped of metal parts) with a heat gun to bring the oils and grime to the surface before wiping off with a rag soaked in acetone (available in hardware stores). It may take several applications to get most of it out. A wash with warm soapy water and a clean water rinse, then put aside for 24 hours to dry before rubbing down with OO steel wool. Follow this up with a few well rubbed in coats of Artist's linseed oilicon over a period of a few days till well dried, then polish with a dry cloth.

  6. #4
    Legacy Member 1903Collector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Last On
    11-19-2022 @ 06:13 PM
    Location
    3rd Rock from the Sun, northern half of the western hemisphere, USA, Texas, Highland Village
    Posts
    177
    Real Name
    David Minick
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    05:33 AM
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce_in_Oz View Post
    This bloke has a few clues on stock work:





    DAYS of educational videos
    First off, I want to know what cigar he smokes! Second, I want many of his cool tools. I ordered a Shinto rasp on Amazon as soon as he described it. Third...using files that were never used on metal before! Good advice.
    I do a fair amount of wood repair like he showed but I need to be more patient, slower, and will employ some of his techniques.

    HOWEVER, I still need advice on the relatively simple cleaning of old wood stocks of any state of repair or disrepair! It just so happens that one of the stocks were of his Majesty King Edward, a 1902 Lee Metford, and the other, an Ishapore No1 MkIII that was in the service of King George, if I am not mistaken. These need cleaning, especially the Metford as it found its way to the states from Ethiopia. The third is a Czar Nickolas M91 that has spiral cracks long the upper stock and a sheared crack almost thru the receiver mount area, but both clean breaks and repairable with prospects of good to very good cosmetic results in my opinion. THAT beings me back to the first step needed. Deep and thorough cleaning. Kersosene, anyone? ;-)

  7. #5
    Contributing Member muffett.2008's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Last On
    Today @ 05:08 AM
    Location
    Scone, NSW. Australia
    Posts
    2,112
    Real Name
    kevin muffett
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    10:33 PM
    The only drawback I see on kerosine, is that it causes metal to rust if not oiled.
    Timber absorbs Kerosine, so if some leaches out it may cause problems under the woodline later on.

  8. #6
    Contributing Member ssgross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Last On
    Today @ 12:47 AM
    Location
    Virginia Swamp
    Posts
    1,300
    Real Name
    Sam
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    06:33 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by 1903Collector View Post
    years of diet, oil
    Auto correct strikes again!
    For what it's worth, the correct solvent to use depends on what is already on the stock and what you want to do. There is chemistry to consider. Different solvents dissolve different chemicals, and some that dissolve a given compound will do so better or worse than another. Some faster or slower too. It is known that petroleum based products will weaken the wood fibers over time because they all will evaporate over time - some products will deteriorate the wood immediately, other petroleum products will take decades to do it. Take a look at old milsurp stocks up around the woodline of the action. The wood is generally softer their than other places further away from lubricated areas.
    Was the stock lacquered? lacquer thinner or acetone, the latter will work very fast. be careful. Was it stained? mineral spirits or stronger versions for oil based stains, alcohol for alcohol based stains after removing the upper finish, etc. Turpentine is a basic solvent for linseed oilicon, but is slow. The "feel" of the stock before you start will tell you if the layers on top were linseed oilicon, often regularly lightly wiped on during normal care over the years. Some would use CLP, grease, or even Hoppe's for wood during regular maintenance (just because it contains banana oil to make it smell oh so sweet doesn't mean it is the best product). Not a good idea, but needs to be removed with a petroleum solvent. Kerosene works, but is it the best option?
    I shy away from arguments of "I use this method all the time because it just works". Every patient is different, and thinking like this will make you get it right and perfect every time.

    An old furniture restorer's trick for stains...Make a paste of acetone and chalk dust and cake it onto the wood. It dries fast, dissolves the compounds making the stain, and the chalk sucks it out and locks it in, preventing the wood from re-absorbing it.

    EDIT: longterm preservation...read here https://www.nramuseum.org/media/1007...20wicklund.pdf
    Last edited by ssgross; 10-03-2022 at 09:59 AM.

  9. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to ssgross For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Advisory Panel Brian Dick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 06:55 PM
    Location
    Edgefield, SC USA
    Posts
    3,928
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    06:33 AM
    I've put this out there before. Here it is again. Try Dollar General or Dollar Tree clear ammonia. I learned it from a guy in Florida who specialized in restoring antique rifles when I was a kid. I have a Brownells plastic tub long enough for forends. Soak the wood, let sit a few minutes, then gently sponge and clean with a fine Scotchbrite scrub/sponge pad. Use a soft toothbrush for the inletting, nooks and crannies. Rinse with clear water and dry. Your wood will be ready for glue, patching if necessary or other repairs. Then just treat with raw linseed oilicon, or stain first if you want. Been doing it that way for 30 years. I work outdoors with it. It's cheap and easy to do and won't hurt a thing. Try it on a handguard or scrap if you don't believe me and see for yourself.

  11. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Brian Dick For This Useful Post:


  12. #8
    Legacy Member limpetmine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 05:01 PM
    Location
    US of A
    Posts
    961
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    05:33 AM
    Back in the day (1980's) when good stuff was coming in, I had the guys in back build me a sheet metal box the length of a rifle. Stripped metal would soak in kerosene for a week, get scrubbed and oiled, while the wood rested on the dash of an inoperable car, wrapped in newspaper and a nasty wool blanket. The oil and crud would rise out of it, then a good scrubbing with murphee's oil soap. I'll have to give Brian's method a go.

  13. #9
    Advisory Panel Brian Dick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Last On
    Yesterday @ 06:55 PM
    Location
    Edgefield, SC USA
    Posts
    3,928
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    06:33 AM
    Remember that the DG or DT clear ammonia is not industrial grade. It's really quite mild as ammonia goes. Obviously, make sure you wear gloves in a well-ventilated area. If your wood is really bad, you can repeat the process as many times as you like to get the desired result. It's not a brutal process and you'll be amazed at the crap that comes off and out of these old wood stocks.

  14. The Following 2 Members Say Thank You to Brian Dick For This Useful Post:


  15. #10
    Legacy Member 1903Collector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Last On
    11-19-2022 @ 06:13 PM
    Location
    3rd Rock from the Sun, northern half of the western hemisphere, USA, Texas, Highland Village
    Posts
    177
    Real Name
    David Minick
    Local Date
    02-08-2023
    Local Time
    05:33 AM
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by muffett.2008 View Post
    The only drawback I see on kerosine, is that it causes metal to rust if not oiled.
    Timber absorbs Kerosine, so if some leaches out it may cause problems under the woodline later on.
    I dint mention, but yes, the wood is completely stripped. Perhaps the sun and heat in Dallas is a factor, but Ive not an issue with kerosene being absorbed let alone blooming later. Still, Ive found some posts that discount the use of kerosene and I am looking for technical reasons why. I have wondered if I should use mineral spirits, Simple Green (I do like that idea) or even turpentine, but for some reason kerosene has been my solvent of choice.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. My Lee Metford has an expensive diet
    By smle addict in forum Range Reports - Show us how good you are!
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-15-2020, 02:47 AM
  2. Grease for Enfields?
    By yoopercollector in forum The Lee Enfield Knowledge Library Collectors Forum
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 03-15-2016, 07:36 PM
  3. RFI NoI Mk3 in grease.
    By Buccaneer in forum The Lee Enfield Knowledge Library Collectors Forum
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-17-2015, 11:38 AM
  4. To remove or not to remove rust on a luger
    By Mudhut in forum Other Military Service Pistols and Revolvers
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 10-21-2011, 06:24 PM
  5. Grease Vs. Oil (Again)
    By tpelle in forum M1/M2 Carbine
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-19-2010, 10:40 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts