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  1. #11
    Advisory Panel Surpmil's Avatar
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    The dents are part of the history, just like the wear on the metal. In addition to the vandalism of stripping stocks to bare wood, a great many people who should know better exhaustively clean antique guns adding nothing to the value and in fact removing the proof of originality such "dirt" provided.
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    Contributing Member Ovidio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surpmil View Post
    The dents are part of the history, just like the wear on the metal. In addition to the vandalism of stripping stocks to bare wood, a great many people who should know better exhaustively clean antique guns adding nothing to the value and in fact removing the proof of originality such "dirt" provided.
    I agree, but some dents, if caused by yourself, can be annoying.
    That was what pushed me to try and eliminate the proof of my sin. Luckily, it was a small dent and the system applied eliminated it without damage to the history of the rifle.
    After that, I have always looked more at the "irons" of my gats than at the woods. A dented stock, like in my K31icon, is not a bad thing. It really just tells you that the rifle has had his service life.
    Also my Gew.98 is well banged, even the castle is well dinged and worn, as is the bolt handle, but the barrel is great. And I love to shoot it.
    34a cp., btg. Susa, 3° rgt. Alpini

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    Contributing Member Sapper740's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surpmil View Post
    The dents are part of the history, just like the wear on the metal. In addition to the vandalism of stripping stocks to bare wood, a great many people who should know better exhaustively clean antique guns adding nothing to the value and in fact removing the proof of originality such "dirt" provided.
    I have a scrubbed Model 1891 Argentine Mauser that was most likely used in the Chaco War which was fought from 1932 to 1935 between Bolivia and Paraguay. Argentinaicon, in an attempt to maintain the illusion of neutrality supported Paraguay with supplies and arms with the Argentine crest scrubbed from the rifles. My rifle survived the war in immaculate condition making me think it was never issued or at least never saw any rough handling. No bluing has been worn away and the stock is in near perfect condition, save one very large dent in the buttstock. I don't know if the dent was caused during the war or post-war but it mars an otherwise near perfect rifle. I am considering removing the dent and I don't think removing it will destroy the history of the rifle but I get what you're saying and most military rifles should be left alone.

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    Advisory Panel Surpmil's Avatar
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    There are exceptions to every rule Sapper740, and you may well have one there!
    “There are invisible rulers who control the destinies of millions. It is not generally realized to what extent the words and actions of our most influential public men are dictated by shrewd persons operating behind the scenes.”

    Edward Bernays, 1928

    Much changes, much remains the same.

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    Contributing Member ssgross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surpmil View Post
    There are exceptions to every rule Sapper740, and you may well have one there!
    "newer" dents will usually have sharper edges, sometimes with torn fibers around the edge. I'm very selective when approaching the topic. A rifle is only new once, and making it look new is certainly not the point. My point and goal is to dial back the decades of neglect and abuse. Steaming the newer looking dents, even if they won't come up all the way (often they won't), will soften the edges. If fibers are torn, there is no hope of removing the blemish, but steaming and blending the oil finish will round out the damage, and make it look like it was always there and part of service use, and not tossed in the back of a tractor and forgotten about for 50 years.

    Metal work is different. A popular smith once asked "So when does lack of maintenance become patina?" This is a whole other can of worms. Please do the "right" maintenance so these pieces last another century, at least. Chief among this maintenance is neutralizing any active rust.

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    Contributing Member Aragorn243's Avatar
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    Removing dents is one thing I've never had a lot of success with. Minor ones yes but bigger ones no. I use an old iron with a steam function. Never put it directly on the wood but folded paper towels. It draws the finish out of the wood at the same time. I'll wet the paper towel before steaming. Some stocks it works great, but most it doesn't do a lot.

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    Contributing Member Ovidio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapper740 View Post
    I have a scrubbed Model 1891 Argentine Mauser that was most likely used in the Chaco War which was fought from 1932 to 1935 between Bolivia and Paraguay. Argentinaicon, in an attempt to maintain the illusion of neutrality supported Paraguay with supplies and arms with the Argentine crest scrubbed from the rifles. My rifle survived the war in immaculate condition making me think it was never issued or at least never saw any rough handling. No bluing has been worn away and the stock is in near perfect condition, save one very large dent in the buttstock. I don't know if the dent was caused during the war or post-war but it mars an otherwise near perfect rifle. I am considering removing the dent and I don't think removing it will destroy the history of the rifle but I get what you're saying and most military rifles should be left alone.
    Probably, that dent has nothing to do with an ordinary service life, and is the result of some accident. I'd consider raising it, most probably.
    34a cp., btg. Susa, 3° rgt. Alpini

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    Legacy Member RAM1ALASKA's Avatar
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    I guess I lost track of this thread.
    Thanks to all for your input!

    Rob

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