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  1. #21
    Contributing Member WarPig1976's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RogueAussie View Post
    RLO or a BLOicon
    Raw will oxidize over time giving a reddish hue, boiled will not.

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  4. #22
    Contributing Member usabaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RogueAussie View Post
    So for someone that's about to oil up a dry stock, whats the difference between using BLOicon, RLO or a BLOicon/Turps mix?
    There are about seven types of Linseed Oil preparations, I wrote this up a while back which cover the three most used types in woodworking;

    Raw Linseed Oil (RLO)
    Raw Linseed Oil (flaxseed oil) is extracted from the seed of the Flax plant though a cold or hot extraction processes. In most cases this oil when purchased commercially, the oil has been filtered and cleaned. If you buy fresh or self-process your own you will need to make you have filtered and clean the oil prior to use. Raw Linseed Oil will take 72 to 80 hours to dry depending on the environment.
    There are two thing I would like to make clear when it comes to Raw Linseed Oil.
    - The first is that Raw Linseed Oil DOES dry. You will find many on electronic forums and in conversations that will tell you that Raw Linseed Oil does not dry. This is false, it is a drying oil and if you do not believe it or would like to test this for yourself you need only wipe a think layer of Raw Linseed Oil on a plate of glass and leave it for a few days.

    - The second is Raw Linseed Oil was the only type of oil used on United Statesicon Military Rifles whose furniture was made of wood up into the 70’s. You will find writings and information in electronic forums and blogs, including the CMPicon’s forums, that will say Boiled Linseed Oil was used, however, none of the persons writing boiled linseed oil was used, can site any government reference materials. It seems to be one of those things that is repeated so many people take it as fact. All government manuals and references discuses and direct use of Raw Linseed Oil. I could of course be wrong and would welcome any Defense (War) Department or other Government documentation indicting the use of anything other than Raw Linseed Oil.

    Boiled Linseed Oil (BLO)
    Boiled Linseed Oil (flaxseed oil) is extracted from the seed of the Flax plant though a cold or hot extraction processes. Then processed in one of two ways depending on the manufacturer:
    - The Raw Linseed Oil is heated in a vacuum chamber to in excess of 560 degrees Fahrenheit then mixed with dryers such as Cobalt Neodecanoate, Cobalt 2- Ethylhexanoate, Mineral Spirits, Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether, Manganese Neodecanoate, and Manganese 2-Ethylhexanoate. This the reason personal protection equipment such as gloves should be worn when applying BLO and a respirator when dry sanding.

    - The Raw Linseed Oil is warmed and the same chemical dryers above are added.

    Boiled Linseed Oil will take 24 to 72 hours to dry depending on the environment.


    Stand Linseed Oil (SLO) also known as Polymerized Oil
    Stand Linseed Oil (flaxseed oil) is extracted from the seed of the Flax plant though a cold or hot extraction processes. Then processed by heating, it may or may not be clarified. Because of the heating Stand Oil is a polymerized oil, contains much less acid and is much thicker than Raw Linseed Oil. Stand Linseed Oil will take 48 to 72 hours to dry depending on the environment. The two main difference in the oils are;
    - Stand Oil is typically clarified and polymerized by heating. It is used mostly by oil paint artists.
    - Polymerized Oil is typically only polymerized by heating to 465° Degrees Fahrenheit and used by the wood working industry from the 1800 to mid 1900’s.

    ---------- Post added at 07:30 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:22 PM ----------

    I use Polymerized Linseed Oil (or SLO) because it is the same finish and method to finish as RLO, drys a bit faster, and doesn't stink as much as RLO.
    Last edited by usabaker; 02-27-2020 at 10:24 PM.
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  7. #23
    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
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    "...and doesn't stink as much as RLO."

    Stink? STINK? linseed oilicon does not stink. It has an aroma!

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    Contributing Member usabaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Chadwick View Post
    "...and doesn't stink as much as RLO."

    Stink? STINK? linseed oilicon does not stink. It has an aroma!
    Okay.. Aroma

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  10. #25
    Contributing Member mrclark303's Avatar
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    It's the same every time someone offers the 'best way to finish military woodwork' question ...


    Always great fun to read the contradictory ideas...

    Right, my turn!

    Under no conditions, is a glossy finish on Milsurp rifle woodwork acceptable to me, not ever, under any circumstances, no matter what....

    First off, if the woodwork is as good as yours looks, then it's simply a matter of maintenance, simply palm in raw linseed oilicon, if it sinks in over a few hours, the wood needs it, if it doesn't, well it doesn't!

    Then buff up with a cloth to a nice semi Matt luster.

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  12. #26
    Contributing Member rcathey's Avatar
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    The old adage is:
    Once a day for a week.
    Once a week for a month.
    Once a month for a year.
    Once a year for the rest of your life.

    Pretty simple!

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  14. #27
    Contributing Member mrclark303's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcathey View Post
    The old adage is:
    Once a day for a week.
    Once a week for a month.
    Once a month for a year.
    Once a year for the rest of your life.

    Pretty simple!
    We are talking woodwork treatment here aren't we
    .303, helping Englishmen express their feelings since 1889

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