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Thread: Best way to glue slightly cracked M1 Cargine stock?

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    Member cantgrowup's Avatar
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    Best way to glue slightly cracked M1 Cargine stock?

    Carbine... (but y'all knew what I meant)

    I just received a stripped walnut M1icon Carbine stock that I bought off of GB. The seller said that the stock had a crack in it, so now I'd like to repair it. It is on the bottom of the stock and runs from the corner of the mag well forward toward the front about 3-4". It is barely visible but if I push on the sides of the mag well opening, the crack opens up to where I could get glue or epoxy into it. The stock has been chemically stripped it appears, and is fairly dry.

    So... what product should I use to repair this crack? Wood glue, 2-part epoxy, ....? Will any old linseed oilicon or other oil that may be deep in the stock, affect the bond?

    Thanks


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    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cantgrowup View Post
    Will any old linseed oilicon or other oil that may be deep in the stock, affect the bond?

    Yes, as you will effectively be trying to glue two linoleum surfaces together. The crack needs to be washed out with a serious solvent like acetone. "Washing" is not quite the right word, rather use a disposable syringe to force the solvent into the crack. Allow to dry for 1 day. Repeat at least twice.
    As for glue, I prefer to use PVA glue, which sets slowly, thus penetrating the wood pores better, and remains very slightly elastic and less likely to fail under shock loading. Most epoxies, following the speed trend, set far too quickly and thus have poor pore penetration. They are also more brittle, and will not "take" if there is the slightest surface contamination remaining.
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 06-09-2014 at 11:43 AM. Reason: Allow to dry,not All to dry!

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    Member cantgrowup's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you very much for the advice. I will try the acetone method. I see that PVA is kinda like Elmer's white glue, but the forums say that Elmer's is not quite the same. Do you have a particular recommended PVA glue that I should use?

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    Really Senior Member gew8805's Avatar
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    Good advice Patrick.

    Elmer's Yellow Glue, I think it is called Carpenters Glue, IIRC. It's a fine product and will do exactly as Patrick suggests in his post. It holds as well as any epoxy and, for most wood working projects, it is better than epoxy due to slower set up time which allows adjustment when needed.

    Also, any excess can be wiped of with a wet rag when it squeezes out of the joint, thus avoiding removal later when it has set.
    Last edited by gew8805; 06-08-2014 at 02:28 PM.

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    Advisory Panel Patrick Chadwick's Avatar
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    Thanks for that support gew8805.

    BTW, I forgot to mention that you will also need a disposable syringe to force the PVA = white glue = Elmers? (more or less) into the crack. And leave the crack clamped up for at least a full 24 hrs before releasing the pressure. Hardwood joints take longer to set than softwood ones.

    BTW2,I have not yet succeeded in applying epoxy with a syringe. It is too viscous (and you can't wash the syringe out afterwards!)

    BTW3, I practice what I preach.
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    https://www.milsurps.com/showthread....ghlight=monkey
    Last edited by Patrick Chadwick; 06-09-2014 at 11:52 AM.

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    Really Senior Member Bruce_in_Oz's Avatar
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    I mentioned this trick in another thread:

    Pressure-pack Carby Cleaner from the local automotive parts shop is handy stuff. If you get the cans with an "extension" tube, you can get the stuff into some very tight places, AND avoid hosing down the entire stock.

    Keep the crack open for a day or so to ensure there is no solvent left in the grain and apply the glue of your choice.

    I have been using epoxy for decades. Recently, on another thread, Peter Laidlericon gave me a "heads-up" on the SERIOUS adhesives used in building / repairing wooden structural components in light aircraft. Basically, if it keeps the wings from falling off.....................

    As for clamping, a simple split as described should just need "reasonable" pressure applied by a padded carpenters clamp. For rounded shapes, I use strips of rubber that have been cut from inner-tubes. You can use surgical tubing, but old tubes ara a lot cheaper. Wind the rubber around the repair, stretching the rubber as you go. It's is amazing how much compression you can get.

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    Really Senior Member gew8805's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce_in_Oz View Post
    As for clamping, a simple split as described should just need "reasonable" pressure applied by a padded carpenters clamp. For rounded shapes, I use strips of rubber that have been cut from inner-tubes. You can use surgical tubing, but old tubes ara a lot cheaper. Wind the rubber around the repair, stretching the rubber as you go. It's is amazing how much compression you can get.
    Good advice.

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    I used gorilla glue on a cracked M1icon stock and it has held up so far. The stuff is activated by water. You actually wet the two surfaces before putting the glue in and it starts bubbling and forces itself into the pores. Drys hard like an epoxy and is waterproof when dry.

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    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
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    Peter L has the name of that aircraft adhesive he may wade in and let you know the name of it, if it keeps aircraft flying it must be good we in Australiaicon would just twitch a bit of wire around it or if in a hurry the good ol' 100mph tape if it threatened to interrupt our shooting.......

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    Member Beltfed's Avatar
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    I use a product called 'Old Brown Glue'.
    Sourced from Lee Valley.
    Clean up is easy with water, self-adheres and has both excellent penetration and adhesion.
    Transparent to staining as well.

    It is made by a company called Antique Refinishers Inc.

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