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  1. #11
    Senior Member 22SqnRAE's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Florey55;455162]Now I have a question about linseed oil. Why would you use a 50/50 oil and turps mix as opposed to just oil. Or the quick drying linseed oil? The one with the drying additives. Im really curious about this.[COLOR="black"]


    F55,

    A good question. When Service Rifle furniture is made, it's rough finished with medium/coarse belt sanding to keep the splinters to minimum. Consequently, most timber is fairly open grained. The usual method of treatment for furniture is being immersed in warm linseed oil for about half an hour, give or take, then drip draining above the warm tanks while the next batch are dipped. The linseed oil is warm to reduce viscosity and aid penetration in the timber to beyond the base of pores.

    The cutting of BLOicon with turps is simply like paint thinner. A less viscous oil will penetrate deeper and the turps is volatile so will evaporate off. It makes application quicker and easier. You'll note that around the neck of a BLOicon bottle, there will be a build up of crusty gunk, or dried BLO. Raw linseed oil will dry out, not as quick and won't crystallise the same. Turps helps with this thickening and gets the BLO to 'go further, quicker.' A stock that's been properly stripped and dried out will take about 4-6 coats of BLO. It can be more, depending on your timber. If using neat oil, then this will require warmth and time. You need to leave the timber in the sun to warm up and allow the oil to both seep in and 'dry' off. This takes several days to complete. Turps helps this process by allowing the oil to go deeper first and dry off quicker. The 4-6 coats of BLO and turps can be done in two days in the warmer months, no problems. That's better than a week or two.



    Boiled linseed oil has the additives and modified molecular structure that allows it to dry quicker. It's not instantaneous, but far shorter than raw linseed. A pure traditionalist will poo-hah the "cheat's" way of using BLO, and good on them. The end result, when done repetitiously and carefully, is the same. and when it comes to maintenance that one needs to do every quarter, then a gentle light wipe of BLO and turps sinks in quickly where it needs to, pools where it doesn't and dries off much quicker than raw.

    Each to their own, but I like the speed and control of cut BLO.

    I've tried Tung Oil that the Garandicon boys like, and find this OK for the initial coat or two, but finish with BLO. Again, choice. Tung is easier to work with when the timber is bare and dry, but I like the more viscous BLO to "fill up" the pores in the timber to water/dust/particle proof the timber.
    Last edited by 22SqnRAE; 07-06-2019 at 12:37 AM. Reason: Grammar and Spelling
    Collection: No 1 Mk 1*, No 1 Mk III*, No 2 Mk IV, No 3 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1, No 4 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1/2, No 4 Mk 2, No 5 Mk 1, US Cal .30 M1903, US Cal .30 M1903A1, US Cal .30 M1903A3, US Cal .30 M1917, Kar 98k.

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    Member Florey55's Avatar
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    Thread Starter
    Off to Bunnings tomorrow to get some beeswax. ( To all you non-Australians, it's a major hardware chain ).

    Question : Will one of these bars be enough for a complete SMLE stock set, or should I get more?

    Thanks, Lenny.


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    Senior Member 22SqnRAE's Avatar
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    Lenny,

    Heaps! You'll do three rifles with that The trick is to use enough to fill the pores, not clog up your working.

    Recall that it's being cut with 1/3 portion of oil and turps, so will fill up an old boot polish tin no worries.

    This is a good therapy session, probably a good thing to do in front of the telly at night. It takes a while and you need a few breaks as the heel of the palm gets hot and sore! You don't use an awful lot in the process, surprisingly.

    Let us know how it turns out.

    Will post some comparison photos this arvo.
    Collection: No 1 Mk 1*, No 1 Mk III*, No 2 Mk IV, No 3 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1, No 4 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1/2, No 4 Mk 2, No 5 Mk 1, US Cal .30 M1903, US Cal .30 M1903A1, US Cal .30 M1903A3, US Cal .30 M1917, Kar 98k.

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    Member Florey55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 22SqnRAE View Post
    Will post some comparison photos this arvo.
    Thanks Peter !

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    Senior Member 22SqnRAE's Avatar
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    Comparison of Wax vs Linseed Oil timber finish

    Lenny,

    Here are a couple of photos to try and show the difference between plain linseed oilicon and linseed with wax.

    The No 4 Mk 1/2 is dressed in birch, and has a lovely 'fishscale' through the timber. This one was stripped, reoiled and waxed. No sanding at all.










    Now here is a fairly stock standard Lithgowicon No 1 Mk III* with a typical ex-Armoury oiled finish. The difference is the open grain and the real lack of sheen. In due course, when I've cleaned several decades of neglect and dirt (including abrasive grit) off her, she'll have the same oil and wax treatment too. No damage to timber, just more protection.









    I hope these come up reasonably, as the difference when in the hand is remarkable.

    For those following the thread, I'll reiterate. This treatment is not just to "make her look good" but to restore and preserve the rifle furniture to Service condition. The wax seals the pores and prevents ingress of water and grit, ensuring the timber remains in good condition and is not further degraded or damaged. These rifles head to the range and do meet the ground in their work. So best protecting them, to keep them working for decades to come.
    Collection: No 1 Mk 1*, No 1 Mk III*, No 2 Mk IV, No 3 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1, No 4 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1/2, No 4 Mk 2, No 5 Mk 1, US Cal .30 M1903, US Cal .30 M1903A1, US Cal .30 M1903A3, US Cal .30 M1917, Kar 98k.

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  10. #16
    Member Florey55's Avatar
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    Thanks for the pictures Peter.
    My, what a lovely workshop that you have.
    I have to make do with a tiny sliver at the back of our garage and the wife has to move her car when I want to use the Hornady LNL AP mounted at the end of my workbench.

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  12. #17
    Really Senior Member 5thBatt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florey55 View Post
    All matching, all original (apart from somebody varnishing the stock)

    Attachment 101459Attachment 101458Attachment 101457Attachment 101460Attachment 101461
    The early BSA MkIIIs also had the serial number stamped on the underside of the cocking piece.

    The cocking piece on my 1911 BSA MkIII

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    Really Senior Member Bruce_in_Oz's Avatar
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    While we are doing "Wax on, Wax off":

    Gilly Stephenson in Perth, WA does a great line of waxes in different grades AND colours.

    The coloured wax sticks are meant for "filling" awkward problems" like fine cracks or open grains and you can be as artistic as you like.

    Free plug here: https://gillyswaxesandpolishes.com.au/

    See also the big green hardware shed near you.

  14. #19
    Senior Member 22SqnRAE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce_in_Oz View Post
    While we are doing "Wax on, Wax off":

    Gilly Stephenson in Perth, WA does a great line of waxes in different grades AND colours.
    Any support to local apiarists to keep bee stocks healthy and active has to be a good cause. Good idea, Bruce
    Collection: No 1 Mk 1*, No 1 Mk III*, No 2 Mk IV, No 3 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1, No 4 Mk 1*, No 4 Mk 1/2, No 4 Mk 2, No 5 Mk 1, US Cal .30 M1903, US Cal .30 M1903A1, US Cal .30 M1903A3, US Cal .30 M1917, Kar 98k.

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