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  1. #61
    Legacy Member RCS's Avatar
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    A few Sharps cartridges

    My photos show a few of the smaller caliber Sharps cartridges which were also very popular for match shooting. I have read that Sharps used a very high quality paper equal to banknote paper for patching their factory bullets.

    Left to right the 40-90 Sharps necked (also a 40 straight too) from around 1876, The only modern case is the RCBS 45 Basic case used to make the 45-120 or 45-140, 45-100 Sharps also from around 1876, used different bullet weight and powder charges. The 45-75 Sharps is a copy of the 45-70 Govt. last is the 40-70 Sharps that was and still is a popular match cartridge.

    There wasn't any purpose to showing the headstamps as all the Sharps cartridges are without headstamps, only the RCBS 45 Basic is headstamped.

    Years ago I made a nose pour .451 cal paper patch mould that was adjustable for bullet length. At the ranges that I fired on, there wasn't much difference between paper patc and plain lead bullets (all were black powder loads)

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  4. #62
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
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    Nice selection there RCS.

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  7. #63
    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
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    Snider & Enfield rounds

    Here are some rounds of interest the first round is an interim paper cartridge for the Snider rifle in .577 this had a special bullet (Info below) as hollow points were not allowed.
    The others are 577/450's for use in the Martini Henry rifle on there are 2 rolled cases and 1 drawn case.

    The first rolled one is a Kynoch they had a viewing window so it could be checked that the outer roll covered the inner roll only Kynoch rounds had this feature.
    (Can see the window about 15mm above the cartridge base.)

    Pic #2 shows the Snider round and how they got around the hollow point bullet read the info below apparently it was a very effective stopper.
    Pic #3 shows a good condition Snider cartridge


    The 1860s also marked the commencement of the European arms race which was largely initiated by the Prussians, who had introduced their Dreyse breech-loading rifle. Pressed for time in the race to adopt a serviceable breech-loader, the Britishicon converted their muzzleloading Enfields into what became known as the Snider rifle. The .577 of an inch calibre remained, but the lead bullet was incorporated into a self-contained brass cartridge. Keen to increase velocity and accuracy, the British set about lightening and balancing this bullet. This was partly achieved by punching a cavity in the nose and spinning the lead over to seal it.

    This new bullet had a velocity of 1 250 feet per second (380.8 m/s) and muzzle energy of 1 666 foot pounds. Its effects upon striking flesh and bone were dramatic. Its soft lead flattened, facilitating retention in the body with a deadly transfer of kinetic energy. The chamber in its nose was thus also compressed, causing the trapped air to burst out with explosive force creating a devastating wound which immediately killed or incapacitated its victim.

    MkVII 303 for scale
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    Last edited by CINDERS; Yesterday at 09:59 AM.

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    Contributing Member CINDERS's Avatar
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    Kynoch .375 Magnum

    My Kynoch .375 Magnum cartridge a very versatile round, this is a nice example of that early production cartridge.
    Whilst technically its not a Nitro Express cartridge I've included it as it has shot and killed all the big game there is on all continents in the world.


    .375 Holland & Holland, rimmless, created by Kynoch of London, Englandicon made between 1926 and 1930s using (then) new Kynoch Brass cases with "KYNOCH 375 MAGNUM " Head-Stamp and loaded with a CCSFMJ (Copper Coated Steel, Full Metal Jacket) projectile.

    MkVII 303 for scale
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